YOU CANNOT POST. OUR WEB HOSTING COMPANY DECIDED TO MOVE THE SERVER TO ANOTHER LOCATION. IN THE MEANTIME, YOU CAN VIEW THIS VERSION WHICH DOES NOT ALLOW POSTING AND WILL NOT SAVE ANYTHING YOU DO ONCE THE OTHER SERVER GOES ONLINE.

"The Broken Buddha" by Ven.Dhammika and other scandals - Page 8 - Dhamma Wheel

"The Broken Buddha" by Ven.Dhammika and other scandals

Exploring Theravāda's connections to other paths. What can we learn from other traditions, religions and philosophies?
User avatar
tiltbillings
Posts: 23012
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2008 9:25 am

Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby tiltbillings » Thu Oct 13, 2011 9:42 pm


User avatar
Viscid
Posts: 930
Joined: Fri Jul 09, 2010 8:55 pm
Location: Toronto, Canada
Contact:

Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby Viscid » Thu Oct 13, 2011 9:52 pm

"What holds attention determines action." - William James

User avatar
mikenz66
Posts: 14947
Joined: Sat Jan 10, 2009 7:37 am
Location: New Zealand

Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby mikenz66 » Thu Oct 13, 2011 9:53 pm


User avatar
Viscid
Posts: 930
Joined: Fri Jul 09, 2010 8:55 pm
Location: Toronto, Canada
Contact:

Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby Viscid » Thu Oct 13, 2011 10:18 pm

"What holds attention determines action." - William James

User avatar
ancientbuddhism
Posts: 882
Joined: Fri Apr 01, 2011 12:53 pm
Location: Cyberia

Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby ancientbuddhism » Thu Oct 13, 2011 10:31 pm

I say, beware of all enterprises that require new clothes, and not rather a new wearer of clothes.” – Henry David Thoreau, Walden, 1854

Secure your own mask before assisting others. – NORTHWEST AIRLINES (Pre-Flight Instruction)


User avatar
tiltbillings
Posts: 23012
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2008 9:25 am

Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby tiltbillings » Thu Oct 13, 2011 10:33 pm


User avatar
ancientbuddhism
Posts: 882
Joined: Fri Apr 01, 2011 12:53 pm
Location: Cyberia

Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby ancientbuddhism » Thu Oct 13, 2011 10:34 pm

It is sad to read such importance given to this tabloid. It has been already said in this thread that this happens elsewhere in religion too. So I will only add that religion can be like a glass house, throw enough stones and you may well break something you like.
I say, beware of all enterprises that require new clothes, and not rather a new wearer of clothes.” – Henry David Thoreau, Walden, 1854

Secure your own mask before assisting others. – NORTHWEST AIRLINES (Pre-Flight Instruction)


User avatar
Viscid
Posts: 930
Joined: Fri Jul 09, 2010 8:55 pm
Location: Toronto, Canada
Contact:

Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby Viscid » Thu Oct 13, 2011 10:37 pm

"What holds attention determines action." - William James

Jhana4
Posts: 1309
Joined: Sat Feb 05, 2011 5:20 pm
Location: U.S.A., Northeast

Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby Jhana4 » Fri Oct 14, 2011 9:14 pm

In reading the scriptures, there are two kinds of mistakes:
One mistake is to cling to the literal text and miss the inner principles.
The second mistake is to recognize the principles but not apply them to your own mind, so that you waste time and just make them into causes of entanglement.

User avatar
tiltbillings
Posts: 23012
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2008 9:25 am

Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby tiltbillings » Fri Oct 14, 2011 9:40 pm


User avatar
Viscid
Posts: 930
Joined: Fri Jul 09, 2010 8:55 pm
Location: Toronto, Canada
Contact:

Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby Viscid » Mon Oct 17, 2011 8:37 pm

"What holds attention determines action." - William James

Jhana4
Posts: 1309
Joined: Sat Feb 05, 2011 5:20 pm
Location: U.S.A., Northeast

Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby Jhana4 » Mon Oct 17, 2011 9:19 pm

In reading the scriptures, there are two kinds of mistakes:
One mistake is to cling to the literal text and miss the inner principles.
The second mistake is to recognize the principles but not apply them to your own mind, so that you waste time and just make them into causes of entanglement.

User avatar
daverupa
Posts: 5980
Joined: Mon Jan 31, 2011 6:58 pm

Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby daverupa » Mon Oct 17, 2011 10:11 pm


User avatar
mikenz66
Posts: 14947
Joined: Sat Jan 10, 2009 7:37 am
Location: New Zealand

Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby mikenz66 » Tue Oct 18, 2011 5:14 am


User avatar
Mr Man
Posts: 2873
Joined: Tue Oct 04, 2011 8:42 am

Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby Mr Man » Tue Oct 18, 2011 8:36 am

It's just another book and in my opinion heavily shaped by Ven Dhammika's own monastic experience. I'm sure that if the Ven had stumbled into Wat Pa Barn Tard (for example) as a young man he would be writing very different books.

What are our expectations of a living religion that is over 2500 years old and which has millions of adherents? Theravada Buddhism is what it is and as Mike points out it still seems to be producing benefit.

User avatar
James the Giant
Posts: 792
Joined: Sat Oct 17, 2009 6:41 am

Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby James the Giant » Tue Oct 18, 2011 10:01 pm

For me, "The Broken Buddha" was an eye-opener.
Before I read this book I had a very rosy, idealistic view of bhikkhus and monastic life. I thought all bhikkhus would be hard-working, serious meditators, and of course they would all follow the vinaya; the Buddha himself laid down those rules, why would a monk not follow them?! I thought monasteries were sincere, intense places, where laypeople and bhikkhus alike strove towards the cessation of suffering.

When I got to know some actual real-life bhikkhus, they sensed this idealistic view in me and recommended I read some books that would challenge that view.
They recommended I read that Phra Peter book "Little Angels", where 10 out of the 12 novices are only in robes because it is a way for them to escape poverty. Only one of the novices had any inclination to actually become a bhikkhu when they reached 20. That startled me.
I read that trashy book "What the Buddha Never Taught", which while superficial, shallow, and biased, did at least give me a little more perspective on the failings of real-life bhikkhus.
And of course Broken Buddha, which was the biggest eye opener of all.
Plus meeting real bhukkhus in a couple of monasteries here in New Zealand... one of them only meditates at morning and evening puja, he says he's no good at it, and will leave it for the next life. He said his aim in this life was to accumulate merit, and perhaps he would be able to meditate better in future rebirths. What!?

Like many people have been saying in this thread, Broken Buddha does present a side of the sangha that some westerners are not aware of.
That is certainly true in my case, and I value this book for showing me that.
However, I don't think I would advise other people read it, especially my friends and family. They don't know anything about Buddhism in the first place, and for them to read this book would leave them with an overwhelmingly negative view of the sangha.
But for me - someone who is seriously considering going forth and who had an unrealistically idealised view of the sangha - it is very useful.
I still intend to ordain, and the book has perhaps prepared me a little... made my eventual encounter with lazy bad monks less of a shock.
Then,
saturated with joy,
you will put an end to suffering and stress.

Jhana4
Posts: 1309
Joined: Sat Feb 05, 2011 5:20 pm
Location: U.S.A., Northeast

Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby Jhana4 » Wed Oct 19, 2011 12:45 am

:goodpost:
In reading the scriptures, there are two kinds of mistakes:
One mistake is to cling to the literal text and miss the inner principles.
The second mistake is to recognize the principles but not apply them to your own mind, so that you waste time and just make them into causes of entanglement.

User avatar
manas
Posts: 2251
Joined: Thu Jul 22, 2010 3:04 am
Location: Melbourne, Australia

Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby manas » Wed Oct 19, 2011 1:57 am

Then the Blessed One, picking up a tiny bit of dust with the tip of his fingernail, said to the monk, "There isn't even this much form...feeling...
perception...fabrications...consciousness that is constant, lasting, eternal, not subject to change, that will stay just as it is as long as eternity."

Jhana4
Posts: 1309
Joined: Sat Feb 05, 2011 5:20 pm
Location: U.S.A., Northeast

Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby Jhana4 » Wed Oct 19, 2011 2:36 am

:goodpost:
In reading the scriptures, there are two kinds of mistakes:
One mistake is to cling to the literal text and miss the inner principles.
The second mistake is to recognize the principles but not apply them to your own mind, so that you waste time and just make them into causes of entanglement.

User avatar
Avery
Posts: 25
Joined: Thu Mar 05, 2009 6:14 pm
Contact:

Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby Avery » Tue Nov 29, 2011 6:02 am

I was totally engrossed in this book and I believe S. Dhammika has done a great thing by documenting the real state of Theravada Buddhism in the present day. Buddhism faces a crisis in Asia and the growing Western community is in danger of repeating the mistakes of the past.

The only thing I think the book is lacking is some perspective, which is indeed why it is a dangerous book to entrust to strangers. An uneducated reader, who isn't familiar with the way of life in Buddhist countries, might be tempted to think that this is either (1) an inherent failure of Buddhism or (2) an inherent failure of Asian culture. Neither of these is true. For example, he points out that Theravada laity never learn anything of morality-- but offering moral teachings to the lay world was never the primary intention of Buddhism, it's a culturally Christian and Western ideal. It's good for lay people to learn, but only because we as Westerners or moderns can see the effects of that education when it's done right. The fact that S. Dhammika should have reminded us of is that every culture has its own failings which leave room for improvement and change for the better. It's natural to recognize failings like this, but we shouldn't try to blame them on anyone, only provide the impetus for change.

:namaste:


Return to “Connections to Other Paths”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 15 guests

Google Saffron, Theravada Search Engine

cron