Alan Wallace on Modern Vipassana

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Re: Alan Wallace on Modern Vipassana

Postby retrofuturist » Sat Jun 12, 2010 10:22 am

Greetings,

tiltbillings wrote:The problem with Wallace is that many modern Vipassana teachers could be read to include any of the following:

...

Ajahn Buddhadasa (1906 - 1993)

Could, but shouldn't, since Ajahn Buddhadasa made no claim to be a vipassana teacher. In fact, Ajahn Buddhadasa said "vipassana cannot be taught".

An extract from ANAPANASATI - MINDFULNESS WITH BREATHING: Unveiling the Secrets of Life: a Manual for Serious Beginners
http://www.what-buddha-taught.net/Books ... athing.htm

Vipassana, insight: literally, "clear seeing," to see clearly, distinctly, directly into the true nature of things, into aniccam-dukkham-anatta. Vipassana is popularly used for mental development practiced for the sake of true insight. In such cases, the physical posture, theory, and method of such practices must not be confused with true realization of impermanence, unsatisfactoriness, and not-self. Vipassana cannot be taught.

Speaking of Buddhadasa, and the matter of sati...

Extract from THE NATURAL CURE FOR SPIRITUAL DISEASE: A Guide into Buddhist Science
http://www.what-buddha-taught.net/Books ... sease2.htm

Sati (mindfulness, reflective awareness, recollection) is the quick awareness and recall of the things which must be recalled. It must be as quick as an arrow. We also can describe sati as a vehicle or transport mechanism of the fastest kind. This most rapid transport doesn't carry material things, it carries wisdom and knowledge. Sati delivers paññä (wisdom) in time to meet our needs. Through the practice of mindfulness with breathing, sati is trained fully.

Metta,
Retro. :)
If you have asked me of the origination of unease, then I shall explain it to you in accordance with my understanding:
Whatever various forms of unease there are in the world, They originate founded in encumbering accumulation. (Pārāyanavagga)


Exalted in mind, just open and clearly aware, the recluse trained in the ways of the sages:
One who is such, calmed and ever mindful, He has no sorrows! -- Udana IV, 7


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Re: Alan Wallace on Modern Vipassana

Postby tiltbillings » Sat Jun 12, 2010 1:31 pm

retrofuturist wrote:Greetings,

tiltbillings wrote:The problem with Wallace is that many modern Vipassana teachers could be read to include any of the following:

...

Ajahn Buddhadasa (1906 - 1993)

Could, but shouldn't, since Ajahn Buddhadasa made no claim to be a vipassana teacher. In fact, Ajahn Buddhadasa said "vipassana cannot be taught".
How seriously can we take him? Actually, for all his bluster, and there is a lot of it, he is quoted a lot by vipassana teachers, but I'd be happy to leave him out of the list.
This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

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Re: Alan Wallace on Modern Vipassana

Postby Goofaholix » Sat Jun 12, 2010 8:18 pm

I haven't heard of Alan B Wallace before this but I find curious that the introduction of the article makes much of his academic achievements and there is nothing about his practise experience.

Surely what qualifies him to make the observations he has has made in the article is what vipassana teachers he has practised under, his retreat experience.
"Proper effort is not the effort to make something particular happen. It is the effort to be aware and awake each moment." - Ajahn Chah
"When we see beyond self, we no longer cling to happiness. When we stop clinging, we can begin to be happy." - Ajahn Chah
"Know and watch your heart. It’s pure but emotions come to colour it." — Ajahn Chah
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Re: Alan Wallace on Modern Vipassana

Postby mikenz66 » Sat Jun 12, 2010 8:41 pm

Goofaholix wrote:I haven't heard of Alan B Wallace before this but I find curious that the introduction of the article makes much of his academic achievements and there is nothing about his practise experience.

Surely what qualifies him to make the observations he has has made in the article is what vipassana teachers he has practised under, his retreat experience.

See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B._Alan_Wallace
Wallace trained as a Tibetan monk for fourteen years, so he has considerable retreat experience. After that he did a bachelor's degree in physics and a phd in religious studies at Stanford. His books on Buddhism and Science (such as "Choosing Reality: A Buddhist View of Physics and the Mind), are some of the few writings in that area that have struck me as remotely useful (in my experience, most writers on Buddhism and Science are either ignorant of Science or Buddhism, or both). In his writings and talks he often talks about the Pali texts and commentaries, and has stated that he sees his understanding of Shamatha as quite similar to Jhana as expounded in the Visuddhimagga. (See the interviews here: http://www.buddhistgeeks.com/2008/03/bg-062-reverberations-from-the-shamatha-project/).


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Re: Alan Wallace on Modern Vipassana

Postby tiltbillings » Sat Jun 12, 2010 11:08 pm

Also B. Alan Wallace, in his more formal books on Tibetan Buddhism does consider Theravada to be hinayana. Basically, he is a jhana-wallah coming from a Gelugpa standpoint.
This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

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Re: Alan Wallace on Modern Vipassana

Postby sukhamanveti » Sun Jun 13, 2010 5:31 am

tiltbillings wrote:This is an irresponsible set of statements by Wallace. It is the sort of thing that reads like a sectarian polemic. There is no balance in it.


Tilt,

I see your point. I think that Wallace made a mistake and could have been more careful with his words ("many modern vipassana teachers"), but he means well. If he appears to be engaging in sectarian attacks, then it is surely unintentional. It is more likely that he is not expressing himself clearly. He has often demonstrated his desire to be nonsectarian. Although he began as a Gelugpa monk, he has studied and practiced all four major Tibetan Buddhist traditions and even some nonTibetan Buddhist traditions. In his book Tibetan Buddhism from the Ground Up, as you probably know, he recommends at least two forms of Theravada meditation and even says, "The path of satipatthana, or close application of mindfulness, is one of the great paths to enlightenment." One of his first teachers denounces sectarianism.

I came across these relevant words from B. Alan Wallace today:

“Over the past thirty-four years that I have studied and practiced Buddhism, I have trained under the guidance of sixty teachers from the East and West. Most of my spiritual mentors have been Tibetan, but I have also learned from meditation masters trained in the Theravada traditions of Burma, Thailand, and Sri Lanka. Among the wide range of meditation practices to which I have been exposed, I have found none more beneficial than the following five Buddhist meditations:

“Meditative quiescence

The Four Applications of Mindfulness (of the body, feelings, mind, and mental objects) [a strong endorsement of Theravada meditation here]

“The Four Immeasurables (compassion, loving-kindness, empathetic joy, and equanimity)

“Dream yoga

“Dzogchen, the Great Perfection [a Nyingma practice]

As far as I’m concerned, these are the greatest hits of the Buddhist meditative tradition because they represent a direct path leading to the realization of our deepest nature [shunyata] and the potentials of consciousness.”

B. Alan Wallace, Genuine Happiness: Meditation as the Path to Fulfillment (Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley and Sons, Inc., 2005), p. 1.

It sounds to me like he actually has a very positive view of Theravada, although he may not always express it very well.
Sīlaṃ balaṃ appaṭimaṃ.
Sīlaṃ āvudhamuttamaṃ.
Sīlamābharaṇaṃ seṭṭhaṃ.
Sīlaṃ kavacamabbhutaṃ.


Virtue is a matchless power.
Virtue is the greatest weapon.
Virtue is the best adornment.
Virtue is a wonderful armor.

Theragatha 614


Sabbapāpassa akaraṇaṃ,
kusalassa upasampadā,
Sacittapariyodapanaṃ,
etaṃ buddhāna sāsanaṃ.


Refraining from all wrong-doing,
Undertaking the good,
Purifying the mind,
This is the teaching of the buddhas.

Dhammapada v. 183/14.5
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Re: Alan Wallace on Modern Vipassana

Postby tiltbillings » Sun Jun 13, 2010 5:58 am

sukhamanveti wrote:
tiltbillings wrote:This is an irresponsible set of statements by Wallace. It is the sort of thing that reads like a sectarian polemic. There is no balance in it.


Tilt,

I see your point. I think that Wallace made a mistake and could have been more careful with his words ("many modern vipassana teachers"), but he means well. If he appears to be engaging in sectarian attacks, then it is surely unintentional. It is more likely that he is not expressing himself clearly.
Just be clear here, I do not see Wallace as some sort of evil sectarianist. It may be that he is not very skilful at expressing himself off the cuff, or it may be that off the cuff he is expressing what he actually thinks. Damdifino, but in either case the interview is a problem, which is too bad for all his supposed non-sectarianism.
This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

"We eat cold eels and think distant thoughts." -- Jack Johnson
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Re: Alan Wallace on Modern Vipassana

Postby alan » Sun Jun 13, 2010 6:23 am

Yes, it is the interview that is the problem. and now we can put this to bed.
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Re: Alan Wallace on Modern Vipassana

Postby tiltbillings » Sun Jun 13, 2010 6:29 am

sukhamanveti wrote:I came across these relevant words from B. Alan Wallace today:

The Four Applications of Mindfulness (of the body, feelings, mind, and mental objects) [a strong endorsement of Theravada meditation here].
Are you saying it is an endorsement of Theravada meditation because it is the “The Four Applications of Mindfulness"?
This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

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Re: Alan Wallace on Modern Vipassana

Postby retrofuturist » Sun Jun 13, 2010 10:20 am

Greetings,

Sobeh wrote:The rubric is asking about whether bare attention is taught alone, or in connection with the rest of sammasati. The vipassana method is not the issue here, but rather the content of the vipassana instruction. In other words, defining bare attention as "initial" means there are later steps. Defining it as "vipassana in sum" is thereby inaccurate and misleading. So, never mind a preliminary teaching or a later one: is a given vipassana teacher defining vipassana solely as bare attention, or not?

Bhikkhu Pesala, as noted, refers to bare attention as a preliminary step, so we expect there will be other meditative skills to learn and that we will not rely solely on bare attention over time. Quite contrary to this, the article is critiquing unnamed individuals who teach that bare attention is the whole of vipassana; the question is whether such individuals exist, which we can find out by discerning how various meditation teachers define vipassana to their students.

It is now largely a matter of finding examples.


In that context, Ajahn Chah said sati is recollection; that it is a cause for the arising of self-awareness and wisdom. It is not awareness itself but a cause for its arising.

That which "looks over" the various factors which arise in meditation is 'sati', mindfulness. This sati is a condition which, through practice, can help other factors to arise. Sati is life. Whenever we don't have sati, when we are heedless, it's as if we are dead. If we have no sati, then our speech and actions have no meaning. This sati is simply recollection. It's a cause for the arising of self-awareness and wisdom. Whatever virtues we have cultivated are imperfect if lacking in sati. Sati is that which watches over us while standing, walking, sitting and lying. Even when we are no longer in samadhi, sati should be present throughout.

Whatever we do we take care. A sense of shame will arise. We will feel ashamed about the things we do which aren't correct. As shame increases, our collectedness will increase as well. When collectedness increases, heedlessness will disappear. Even if we don't sit in meditation, these factors will be present in the mind.

And this arises because of cultivating sati. Develop sati! This is the dhamma which looks over the work we are doing or have done in the past. It has usefulness. We should know ourselves at all times. If we know ourselves like this, right will distinguish itself from wrong, the path will become clear, and cause for all shame will dissolve. Wisdom will arise.

Source: http://www.what-buddha-taught.net/Books ... reedom.htm

Metta,
Retro. :)
If you have asked me of the origination of unease, then I shall explain it to you in accordance with my understanding:
Whatever various forms of unease there are in the world, They originate founded in encumbering accumulation. (Pārāyanavagga)


Exalted in mind, just open and clearly aware, the recluse trained in the ways of the sages:
One who is such, calmed and ever mindful, He has no sorrows! -- Udana IV, 7


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Re: Alan Wallace on Modern Vipassana

Postby Ben » Sun Jun 13, 2010 1:32 pm

Hi Tilt and all,

Sorry to come into this conversation so late and pick up on an earlier post, but I've just been away managing a ten-day retreat in the tradition of one of those naughty vipassana traditions.

With regards to Tilt's point:
tiltbillings wrote:This is an irresponsible set of statements by Wallace. It is the sort of thing that reads like a sectarian polemic. There is no balance in it.


I haven't had time yet to read the article in question, but I did get half-way through Wallace's "Attention Revolution" which is marketed as a mindfulness-meditation manual striped of Vajrayana before putting it down. While I did have high hopes for the book, I was disappointed with insinuations he made in the work which gave one the distinct impression that the samatha practices within the Theravada were lacking or inferior to those practiced within the Diamond-Buick. It was disappointing.
kind regards

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Re: Alan Wallace on Modern Vipassana

Postby Jack » Sun Jun 13, 2010 3:04 pm

Vipassana, insight: literally, "clear seeing," to see clearly, distinctly, directly into the true nature of things, into aniccam-dukkham-anatta. Vipassana is popularly used for mental development practiced for the sake of true insight. In such cases, the physical posture, theory, and method of such practices must not be confused with true realization of impermanence, unsatisfactoriness, and not-self. Vipassana cannot be taught.

=
The last line in the above quote could be misleading. The whole sentence reads. “Vipassana cannot be taught, although methods to nurture it are taught.” My understanding is that this is similar to a music teacher saying I can teach people the method of playing the violin but that quality which produces the first violin of the Philadelphia Orchestra cannot be taught

Here is a quote from another place in the same book, ”There are many approaches to vipassana, and anapanasati is one of the most important.” I think Buddhadasa Bhikkhu might say he doesn’t teach vipassana but he does teach the Anapanasati Sutta which doesn’t use the words jhana or vipassana but does start with concentration and end in insight into the 3 Marks. I think he does teach vipassana but calls it something else and places it within the Anap. Sutta.

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Re: Alan Wallace on Modern Vipassana

Postby Jack » Sun Jun 13, 2010 3:32 pm

>>While such naughty modern Vipassana teachers may be out there I have never read any or practiced with any modern Vipassana teachers who have not put bare attention into its much broader Dhamma context.<<

===
For those interested, here is a guided vipassana meditation by Joseph Goldstein:
http://www.dharma.org/ims/mr_audio.php#. This form seems to that used by most Vipassana teachers, at least those connected with IMS. Nowhere is bare intention mentioned. But, I think bare intention as not adding imagination to whatever enters a sense door (seeing in the seeing, etc.) is implied.

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Re: Alan Wallace on Modern Vipassana

Postby Aloka » Sun Jun 13, 2010 4:52 pm

Alan Wallace has said:

The primary meaning of sati, on the other hand, is recollection, non-forgetfulness. This includes retrospective memory of things in the past, prospectively remembering to do something in the future, and present-centered recollection in the sense of maintaining unwavering attention to a present reality. The opposite of mindfulness is forgetfulness, so mindfulness applied to the breath, for instance, involves continuous, unwavering attention to the respiration. Mindfulness may be used to sustain bare attention (manasikara), but nowhere do traditional Buddhist sources equate mindfulness with such attention.


The Pali states:
"What is sammasati? Sati means to bear in mind or bring to mind. Sati is the state of recollecting, the state of remembering, the state of non-fading, the state of non-forgetting. Sati means the sati that is a Spiritual Faculty, the sati that is a Spiritual Power, Sammasati, the Sati that is an Enlightenment Factor, that which is a Path Factor and that which is related to the Path. This is what is called sammasati."

[Vbh.105, 286]


Also:
One is mindful to abandon wrong view & to enter & remain in right view: This is one's right mindfulness.

One is mindful to abandon wrong resolve & to enter & remain in right resolve: This is one's right mindfulness.

One is mindful to abandon wrong speech & to enter & remain in right speech: This is one's right mindfulness.

One is mindful to abandon wrong action & to enter & remain in right action: This is one's right mindfulness.

One is mindful to abandon wrong livelihood & to enter & remain in right livelihood: This is one's right mindfulness.

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html



"And what is the faculty of mindfulness? There is the case where a monk, a disciple of the noble ones, is mindful, highly meticulous, remembering & able to call to mind even things that were done & said long ago. He remains focused on the body in & of itself — ardent, alert, & mindful — putting aside greed & distress with reference to the world. He remains focused on feelings in & of themselves... the mind in & of itself... mental qualities in & of themselves — ardent, alert, & mindful — putting aside greed & distress with reference to the world. This is called the faculty of mindfulness.

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html




Or his mindfulness that 'There is a body' is maintained to the extent of knowledge & remembrance. And he remains independent, unsustained by (not clinging to) anything in the world.

Or his mindfulness that 'There are feelings' is maintained to the extent of knowledge & remembrance. And he remains independent, unsustained by (not clinging to) anything in the world.

Or his mindfulness that 'There is a mind' is maintained to the extent of knowledge & remembrance. And he remains independent, unsustained by (not clinging to) anything in the world.

Or his mindfulness that 'There are mental qualities' is maintained to the extent of knowledge & remembrance. And he remains independent, unsustained by (not clinging to) anything in the world.

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html



Bhikkhu Thanissaro says:

To see how Right Mindfulness and Right Concentration help each other in the practice, we can look at the three stages of mindfulness practice given in the Foundations of Mindfulness Sutta. Take the body as an example. The first stage is to keep focused on the body in and of itself, putting aside greed and distress with reference to the world. What this means is taking the body as a body without thinking about it in terms of what it means or what it can do in the world. It could be either good or bad looking. It could be strong or weak. It could be agile or clumsy — all the issues we tend to worry about when we think about ourselves. The Buddha says to put those issues aside.

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/auth ... cmind.html



The Pali sources appear to agree with Alan Wallace and disagree with the notion of sati as 'bare awareness'.

The Pali agrees with Alan that mindfulness may be used to sustain bare attention but nowhere do traditional Buddhist sources equate mindfulness with such attention.
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Re: Alan Wallace on Modern Vipassana

Postby Aloka » Sun Jun 13, 2010 5:36 pm

Also, Alan Wallace states:
When mindfulness is equated with bare attention, it can easily lead to the misconception that the cultivation of mindfulness has nothing to do with ethics or with the cultivation of wholesome states of mind and the attenuation of unwholesome states. Nothing could be further from the truth. In the Pali Abhidhamma, where mindfulness is listed as a wholesome mental factor, it is not depicted as bare attention, but as a mental factor that clearly distinguishes wholesome from unwholesome mental states and behavior. And it is used to support wholesome states and counteract unwholesome states.


Wallace's view here appears to accord with the Great Forty sutta, as follows:

One is mindful to abandon wrong view & to enter & remain in right view: This is one's right mindfulness.


One is mindful to abandon wrong resolve & to enter & remain in right resolve: This is one's right mindfulness.

One is mindful to abandon wrong speech & to enter & remain in right speech: This is one's right mindfulness.

One is mindful to abandon wrong action & to enter & remain in right action: This is one's right mindfulness.

One is mindful to abandon wrong livelihood & to enter & remain in right livelihood: This is one's right mindfulness.

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Re: Alan Wallace on Modern Vipassana

Postby tiltbillings » Sun Jun 13, 2010 6:54 pm

Aloka wrote:Wallace's view here appears to accord with the Great Forty sutta, as follows:
There is no question that the distortion he trots out is a problem, though I have not read any teacher who would teach so nor have I ever heard any teacher state or imply bare attention without a Dhamma and ethical context. They may be out there, but I suspect they are not the majority or even near it. But again, the problem in the interview is that by implication all modern vipassana teachers are suspect given that he does not balance out his comments by pointing to teachers who he feels got it right, which would have been a very easy - and the proper - thing to do, given the nature of the criticism. Add to his characerization of the unnamed many, who he finds distorting the Dhamma, the sniper thing, we have a fairly ugly document, either the result of not mindfully thinking things through or, it is exactly what he thinks and means to do.
This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

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Re: Alan Wallace on Modern Vipassana

Postby tiltbillings » Sun Jun 13, 2010 7:00 pm

Jack wrote:
Vipassana, insight: literally, "clear seeing," to see clearly, distinctly, directly into the true nature of things, into aniccam-dukkham-anatta. Vipassana is popularly used for mental development practiced for the sake of true insight. In such cases, the physical posture, theory, and method of such practices must not be confused with true realization of impermanence, unsatisfactoriness, and not-self. Vipassana cannot be taught.

Ven Buddhadasa's use of vipassana in the above quote (also quoted by Retro) is correct. Vipassana refers to the insights that come about via watching the rise and fall of the mind/body process with a concentrated and mindfull mind.
This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

"We eat cold eels and think distant thoughts." -- Jack Johnson
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Re: Alan Wallace on Modern Vipassana

Postby tiltbillings » Sun Jun 13, 2010 7:02 pm

Aloka wrote:The Pali sources appear to agree with Alan Wallace and disagree with the notion of sati as 'bare awareness'.

The Pali agrees with Alan that mindfulness may be used to sustain bare attention but nowhere do traditional Buddhist sources equate mindfulness with such attention.
And do you think such teachers as Mahasi Sayadaw or U Pandita are not in line with what the Pali sources teach?
This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

"We eat cold eels and think distant thoughts." -- Jack Johnson
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Re: Alan Wallace on Modern Vipassana

Postby Yundi » Sun Jun 13, 2010 10:24 pm

tiltbillings wrote:There is no question that the distortion he trots out is a problem, though I have not read any teacher who would teach so nor have I ever heard any teacher state or imply bare attention without a Dhamma and ethical context.


In the Sedaka Sutta, the Buddha makes the distinction between choosing to direct awareness to the internal body or to have the bare awareness of a naked woman.

Mindfulness implies 'choice'. One chooses the object of meditation over the bare awareness of whatever comes into the sphere of consciousness.

The Buddhist tradition holds mindfulness as 'the gatekeeper', where mindfulness keeps unwholesome dhammas out and allows wholesome dhammas in.

Mindfulness is not the bare or choiceless awareness of whatever comes into the sphere of awareness.

Mindfulness keeps awareness 'bare'. It keeps awareness free from distracting thoughts, it keeps awareness free from covetous & grief, it keeps awareness free from clinging, it works to overcome the five hindrances plus it keeps awareness directed at the object of meditation.

Mindfulness may keep awareness 'bare' but mindfulness is not awareness itself. It is recollection. It is remembering. It is keeping & bearing in mind, as the Lord Buddha taught.

The Blessed One said, "Suppose, monks, that a large crowd of people comes thronging together, saying, 'The beauty queen! The beauty queen!' And suppose that the beauty queen is highly accomplished at singing & dancing, so that an even greater crowd comes thronging, saying, 'The beauty queen is singing! The beauty queen is dancing!' Then a man comes along, desiring life & shrinking from death, desiring pleasure & abhorring pain. They say to him, 'Now look here, mister. You must take this bowl filled to the brim with oil and carry it on your head in between the great crowd & the beauty queen. A man with a raised sword will follow right behind you and wherever you spill even a drop of oil, right there will he cut off your head.' Now what do you think, monks: Will that man, not paying attention to the bowl of oil, let himself get distracted outside?"

"No, lord."

"I have given you this parable to convey a meaning. The meaning is this: The bowl filled to the brim with oil stands for mindfulness immersed in the body. Thus you should train yourselves: 'We will develop mindfulness immersed in the body. We will pursue it, hand it the reins and take it as a basis, give it a grounding, steady it, consolidate it, and undertake it well.' That is how you should train yourselves."


With metta

:smile:
Last edited by Yundi on Sun Jun 13, 2010 10:56 pm, edited 6 times in total.
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Re: Alan Wallace on Modern Vipassana

Postby Yundi » Sun Jun 13, 2010 10:43 pm

tiltbillings wrote:And do you think such teachers as Mahasi Sayadaw or U Pandita are not in line with what the Pali sources teach?

Any teacher that defines sati is awareness in the sense of being cognizant or consciousness of an object is out of line with the Pali sources.

The Pali term for cognition is vinanna and the various terms that imply clear, direct &/or sustained seeing such as anupassana (contemplation) & vipassana (seeing clearly) have similar meanings.

The term 'bare awareness' has the same meaning, that is, the pure cognition of an object without judgment.

The English term 'awareness' can also mean 'vigilance' or 'heedfulness', meaning having an underlying understanding or wisdom.

The term 'bare awareness' does not imply 'reflective recollective heedfulness'. Instead, it implies 'clear seeing'.

So yes, teachers who use the term 'bare awareness' for mindfulness are out of line with the Pali sources.

The Buddha used the term 'anupassana' when referring to observing an object without judgements, that is, kayanupassana, vedanupassana, cittanupassana & dhammanupassa.

Mindfulness is not contemplating the four objects of satipatthana per se. Mindfulness is keeping the four objects of satipatthana in mind as the chosen objects of contemplation (at the expense of contemplating other objects, such as naked dancing women).

With metta

:smile:

Main Entry: aware
Pronunciation: \ə-ˈwer\
Function: adjective
Etymology: Middle English iwar, from Old English gewær, from ge- (associative prefix) + wær wary — more at co-, wary
Date: before 12th century

1 archaic : watchful, wary
2 : having or showing realization, perception, or knowledge

— aware·ness noun
synonyms aware, cognizant, conscious, sensible, alive, awake mean having knowledge of something.

aware implies vigilance in observing or alertness in drawing inferences from what one experiences <aware of changes in climate>.

cognizant implies having special or certain knowledge as from firsthand sources <not fully cognizant of the facts>.

conscious implies that one is focusing one's attention on something or is even preoccupied by it <conscious that my heart was pounding>.

sensible implies direct or intuitive perceiving especially of intangibles or of emotional states or qualities <sensible of a teacher's influence>.

alive adds to sensible the implication of acute sensitivity to something <alive to the thrill of danger>. awake implies that one has become alive to something and is on the alert <a country always awake to the threat of invasion>.
Yundi
 

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