David's Book: Buddha's Lists: Over 600 Lists

Theravāda in the 21st century - modern applications of ancient wisdom

David's Book: Buddha's Lists: Over 600 Lists

Postby yawares » Fri Oct 19, 2012 12:48 pm

Dear Members,

David's Book: The Seven Enlightenment Factors
[By Dr. David N. Snyder]


The Seven Factors of Enlightenment

1. Mindfulness
2. Investigation
3. Energy
4. Rapture
5. Calm
6. Concentration
7. Equanimity

The Seven Factors of Enlightenment are mental factors of your mind which you may notice
arising in your meditation sessions or in your life meditation sessions. Notice how an
enlightenment factor arises and how it disappears. When you notice an enlightenment factor
present, like anything else keep a balanced mind, do not push it away or cling to it. This
balanced mind is equanimity, another enlightenment factor.

This chapter will attempt to guide you through a step-by-step procedure to Awakening. Each
individual experiences the Dhamma in different ways and may have different experiences, so
presented here is just one example of what a step-by-step guide might look like. The actual steps
you take and especially the order may be slightly different, but the basic ideas and training levels
are based on the Buddha‘s words. References to stages of Realization, jhanic levels, and
hindrances eliminated are from the exact teachings of the Buddha.

At each level of the four stages of enlightenment, there is no turning back. Enlightenment is
guaranteed in a certain amount of time or less. One does not return downward once even the
first stage is reached. ―So too, bhikkhus, when a bhikkhu is developing and cultivating the Noble
Eightfold Path . . . it is impossible that he will give up the training and return to the lower life.
For what reason? Because for a long time his mind has slanted, sloped, and inclined towards
seclusion. Thus, it is impossible that he will return to the lower life.‖ Samyutta Nikaya 45.160
This step-by-step guide is based on the exact and general teachings of the Buddha and emotional
intelligence skills, and from some of my own observations and experiences. It is not meant to be
a hard-fast, written in stone declaration, just a general guideline. As of the writing of this book, I
know of no other Dhamma book that has made this attempt to put in writing a general guideline
such as this one to assist practitioners on the Path.

The Step-by-Step Guide to Awakening

Presented below are potential steps that could be taken along the Path that could lead to full
enlightenment. A person proceeds from one step to the next one only after the current step is
completed in full.
In one of the Buddha‘s discourses there is a list of 37 steps to enlightenment and they are listed
as: the four foundations of mindfulness, the four supreme efforts, the four means to
accomplishment, the five faculties, the five strengths, the eightfold middle path, and the seven
factors of enlightenment. The step-by-step guide presented here includes these steps and other
insights of the Buddha mentioned in other discourses which are also important requisites to
enlightenment. Also included in this list are some ―emotional intelligence‖ traits which
correspond to the appropriate hindrances to enlightenment which are being eradicated. This list
is written in more modern language with specific practice information, such as how much time
should be spent on meditation and when each jhana level should be realized.

As you practice meditation on the Dhamma Path, you work to ―avoid all evil, cultivate the good,
and purify your mind.‖ Progress should not be the focus of your Path. But we also need to
know how we are doing and where we are faltering. This is why it is good to check your
progress with a competent Dhamma teacher or through this guide printed here, but do not make
it a focus or an opportunity to express your ego, such as informing everyone of the exact ―step‖
you are on and how ―close‖ you might be to full enlightenment. As you will see from this guide,
people will know how advanced you are by how you are able to deal with everyday problems
and issues and not by any certification from a teacher or course. There is no set minimum or
maximum time period for each step unless it is listed and it can vary from one week to many
years (or even many lifetimes) per step, depending on the person and their determination and
effort.

1. Economic house in order. The first step is to have your ―economic house‖ in order. This
means that you have no serious economic problems, you have a Right Livelihood, or if you are a
student under the care of a parent, you are doing well in your studies and perform any required
chores of the household. This is important because if we are struggling to put food on the table
we will not be able to focus on spiritual issues. The Buddha understood the importance of
economic conditions and outlined a budget for lay people (see chapter 3) and found that
immorality is largely caused by poor economic conditions.
This should not be construed to mean that the poor are not able to access the stages of
enlightenment. If a person is poor, but otherwise is not too focused on budget problems, the
practice can still be worked on and progress can be made. At the same time, a rich person must
not be too focused on the accumulation of further wealth, as this too will distract the person
from the spiritual goals.

2. Read several Dhamma books. Never underestimate the power of reading and knowledge.
The ultimate enlightenment experiences may be through an experiential event, but we must first
start with some faith or confidence in the teachings. This is achieved through much reading.
You also read and investigate other religions and philosophies if you have not done so already,
before you embarked on this path.

3. Start a regular meditation practice. Try to meditate at least one hour per week at the start. If
you can do more, great, but if you find it difficult for time constraints or frustration, then
meditate just one hour per week. At first you can simply meditate with a Dhamma group, which
typically meets one day per week. If you meditate at home, try to do at least one hour per week
or alternatively at least ten minutes per day. Even ten minutes per day is better than no time at
all for meditation.

4. You begin to see the value and logic of the moral issues of the five precepts and the Eightfold
Middle Path and the Ten Perfections and attempt to practice the virtues therein.

5. Continue meditating at home, with a group, and reading Dhamma books for another long
period of time. The time may vary person-to-person, but this step can range from three months
to over 20 years. You develop a wholesome desire to learn more about the Dhamma and wish to
attain higher spiritual states.

6. Participate in Dhamma discussion groups at Dhamma centers. Now you tend to associate
more with people who are also practicing the Dhamma. You lose interest in other discussions
that are not related to Buddha-Dhamma. You still participate in all kinds of conversations with
people in all subjects, as you are still a part of the conventional world, but your preferred interest
is more towards Dhamma.

7. Your practice has now increased from one hour per week to about four hours per week, or at
least 30 minutes per day. You regularly meditate with a group and also attend other groups on
different occasions. You meditate using the contemplation of the breath and now you also move
to other subjects of the sensations, the mind, and the Dhamma.

8. At this point your confidence in the teachings has gone from a faith or confidence in the
teachings to an informed knowledge from intellectual analysis and understanding. You
understand the teachings in a way that makes sense from the point of analysis, common sense,
and logic.

9. Your new knowledge has increased your interest even further. You attend at least one 7 day
or 10 day retreat. On the retreat you meditate up to 12 hours per day with periods of sitting
meditation, walking meditation, and personal interviews with a teacher. (If you can not
attend a retreat due to financial or time constraints, you can do a self-guided retreat at your home
for a 7 to 10 day period.)

10. You return from retreat and continue your practice with at least four hours of meditation per
week. You have your first insight on the Path. This is the understanding that kamma is
something very real and can be experienced. You understand, not only intellectually, but also
from your experiences the workings of kamma. You see how things have happened to you in the
past as a result of your deeds.

----------------to be continued------------
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David's Book:The Step-by-Step Guide to Awakening 11-30

Postby yawares » Sat Oct 20, 2012 12:16 pm

Dear Members,

David's Book : The Step-by-Step Guide to Awakening
[By Dr.David N. Snyder]


11. At this point there is at least an intellectual understanding that there is no permanent self. As
we have seen in the chapter on Buddha and Science, this can be done with some information we
have from knowledge of the natural sciences. This paves the way toward eliminating the first
hindrance to enlightenment, ―The belief in a permanent personality, self, or ego, also known as
soul.

12. You have insight into mind and matter and the distinction between consciousness and the
objects of consciousness. This is the first main insight of the Path. You now have somewhat of
an understanding of no-self, but you have not yet completely understood or experienced no-self
yet.

13. You come to the realization that kamma is your only real property. You may own a house, a
car, hold various degrees, etc., but you will take none of that with you when you die. The only
thing you take with you is your kamma and / or stage of Realization, if you have attained to any
of the levels of enlightenment.

14. Knowing the above realizations, practicing morality, such as the five precepts, becomes
easier because you understand the workings of kamma. You are able to follow the four supreme
efforts better in guarding your thoughts so that they remain wholesome for as much as possible.
15. One understands the workings of kamma to such an extent that one knows that there is no
external force at work controlling the universe or the natural laws of cause and effect.
16. There are enough confidence and understanding in the Path that one eliminates the second
hindrance to enlightenment of ―doubt, extreme skepticism.

17. After the elimination of doubt and with continued confidence and understanding, one
realizes that rites, rituals, and ceremonies are useless and do not make one progress on the Path.
One may still participate in ceremonies as a formality or to participate with a group function, but
one realizes that such rituals have no intrinsic worth and do not make one progress.

18. At this point one has eliminated the first three hindrances at least intellectually, but one is
still not a stream-entrant, the first stage of enlightenment, because there has not been an
experiential view or glimpse of nibbana yet. One continues to practice, now about one hour per
day or seven hours per week. The concentration and mindfulness are growing stronger.

19. You notice that you are able to express your feelings more openly and do not hide feelings
as much as you may have before.

20. You are able to identify and label your feelings. You note different feelings in your
meditation sessions.

21. You are able to manage your feelings.

22. You are able to delay gratification for higher goals easier. For example, attending college or
graduate school and putting off entertainment choices for higher goals. Or it can be working
harder at your employment to acquire a promotion or taking up some other kind of on-the-job
training. If you are not young and have met most of your life goals, this step can still apply to
you by foregoing some entertainment choices to go to a retreat, for example.

23. You are better able to control your impulses and do not react so quickly to what someone
says, especially if it is critical.

24. You are able to understand the difference between feelings and actions.

25. You notice that you frequently engage in a self-talk where you have an inner dialogue as a
way to cope with a topic or to challenge or reinforce your behavior.

26. You understand the behavioral norms of what is acceptable behavior and what is not.

27. You see yourself in a positive light with good self-confidence. You recognize your strengths
and weaknesses.

28. You are able to laugh at yourself. For example, if someone makes a joke that is slightly
insulting to some weakness you might have, you can laugh with the person, instead of starting an
argument.

29. One continues the practice and reaches a point of heightened concentration and enters the
first jhana of pleasant sensations (see chapter on jhanas for the typical procedure for entering
the jhanas). One experiences an insight into the three characteristics of existence: the unenlightened
life is suffering, impermanence, and no-self. By seeing the arising and passing away
of pleasant and painful sensations, one gains insight into these three characteristics of existence.

30. One continues the practice and reaches a point of further concentration and enters the second
jhana of joy. One experiences the insight that mental and physical phenomena arise and pass
away and one clearly sees this.

*************to be continued**********
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David's Book :The Step-by-Step Guide #31 - 55

Postby yawares » Sun Oct 21, 2012 12:19 pm

Dear Members,

I truly love this topic even I'm not a meditator :heart:

************
David's Book :The Step-by-Step Guide to Awakening
[By Dr.David N. Snyder]


31. One continues the practice and reaches a point of further concentration and enters the third
jhana of contentment. One experiences the insight of what is path and what is not-path. One
gains the insight that the blissful states of the jhanas are pleasant, but it is the wisdom of insight
that leads to the goal of nibbana. Confidence in the Path is now even stronger.

32. One continues the practice and enters the fourth jhana of utter peacefulness. An insight into
dissolution is gained which further experiences the impermanence of all phenomena. Neutral
feelings and equanimity begin to grow in the meditation sessions.

33. There is an insight into the fearsomeness of all phenomena due to their impermanence.

34. One sees the disgusting nature of all phenomena as they decay and fall apart.

35. One has an insight arising from a profound conviction to continue the practice to reach the
cessation of suffering.

36. One has an insight experience of equanimity where there is a great calming peace, giving the
meditator a slight glimpse of what an arahant, enlightened person feels.

37. One continues the practice and reaches a point where mental and physical phenomena
momentarily come to a stop. One gains an insight so profound that it is a glimpse of nibbana.
This is the enlightenment experience of stream-entry. One sees the three characteristics of
suffering, impermanence, and no-self very clearly at this point. One is now a stream-entrant.
One is guaranteed no more than seven more re-births before complete, full enlightenment. The
number of re-births can not be more than seven, but it could be less than seven with continued
effort and determination. Re-birth will only be in a higher realm of human or the heavenly
planes. This is a place of ―safe-haven.‖ One can not revert back to a lower level at this point.
From this point, one can not ―lose‖ the insights gained up to this point or regress to a lower
position, even after death. If one makes no further progress beyond this point, the stage of
stream-entry still ―goes with you on to the future lives.

A total of 37 steps are needed based on this guide to reach the first stage of enlightenment. As
you can see the practice is not easy and not something to be taken too lightly. It is very serious
and very difficult. But with much determination and effort, stream-entry can be reached in this
lifetime. The famous vipassana teacher, Dipa Ma, from India, once said that not reaching at least
the level of stream-entry is a waste of a human life. I agree with Dipa Ma, as I also always felt
that not living the spiritual life is wasted as you spend your time focusing on pleasures of the
senses, food, and sleep, which is basically no different than a life as an animal. If we are not
spiritual and make no spiritual practice we will have lived the life of a common animal and have
wasted a precious human life and opportunity.

38. As a new stream-entrant one no longer knowingly violates any moral issue, including the
five precepts. One may accidentally violate a moral precept, but what matters is intent. If you
find yourself purposely violating a moral precept, then the experience of stream-entry must not
have been genuine and one must go back to a step before number 37 above.

39. One has unshakable confidence in the Buddha-Dhamma at this point and does not sway or
have any remainder of doubt in the ability of the Path to reach full enlightenment.

40. One continues with the meditation practice, including an effective life meditation with lesser
amounts of ill-will and anger.

41. One continues with the meditation practice and attends more 7 to 10 day retreats.

42. One feels a great inner peace and noticeably less stress than what was experienced prior to
being a stream-entrant.

43. At this point the knowledge and insight of Dhamma is strong enough that one may wish to
be a part-time or full-time teacher or to assist with instruction at Dhamma centers or one may
continue as an aspiring ―silent buddha, by attending more retreats.

44. One has good verbal skills in making clear requests.

45. One is more likely to observe rather than react, for example, when anger arises.

46. One responds to criticism more effectively.

47. One does not try to force certain things to happen, is able to ―let go more and not get
obsessed about various things.

48. One is able to resist negative influences better.

49. One has less interest in conflict and argumentation.

50. One is able to listen to others better and in helping others.

51. You tend to be more flexible and less dogmatic.

52. One has accepted full personal responsibility for whatever happens. One does not blame
others for mistakes or misfortunes in one‘s life.

53. One has greater empathy for others and greater care and concern for others.

54. One can clearly distinguish between one‘s feelings, thoughts, and reactions.

55. There is a loss of the need to fear and worry.

******to be continued***********
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David's Book :The Step-by-Step Guide #56 - #70

Postby yawares » Mon Oct 22, 2012 1:22 pm

Dear Members,

I think the step-by-step guide will help me to be a better DW member/better neighbor! :thumbsup:

**************
David's Book :The Step-by-Step Guide to Awakening
[By Dr.David N. Snyder]


56. One is able to communicate effectively through non-verbal communication, knowing how to
make the correct contact through facial expressions, tone of voice, gestures, and so on, without
offending others.

57. One becomes more skillful at problem solving and decision making, for example,
controlling impulses, setting goals, identifying alternative actions, and anticipating potential
consequences.

58. One has a better understanding of the perspective of others.

59. One sees and recognizes social influences on behavior and sees oneself in the perspective of
the larger community.


60. One continues the practice and enters the fifth jhana of infinity of space. This is the first
immaterial jhana or realm of the form-less. Re-birth is likely to a heavenly plane for those who
have attained to the fifth jhana or higher.

61. One continues the practice and enters the sixth jhana of infinity of consciousness.

62. During a meditation session or when in a jhanic state, one feels an inter-connection to other
living beings and nature.

63. At this point one sees the value of the Dhamma and equanimity very well. Attachment to
sense desires is greatly weakened. For example, if you have attachments to certain food
cravings, these will be greatly weakened at this point. If there are other items or people you
are too attached to, these too will be weakened. Metta or loving-kindness for others will not be
weakened, just attachment.


64. One gains the enlightenment experience and stage of once-returner by once again seeing the
universal characteristics of existence, this time more clearly and with the insights of some of the
form-less jhanas. One has not eliminated any more of the ten hindrances to enlightenment, but
the fourth and fifth hindrances of attachment to sense desires and ill-will / anger, have been
greatly weakened. This is another ―safe haven where one can not regress to a lower level in this
life or any future lives. Full enlightenment is guaranteed in no more than one more life.
Re-birth for the one last time will be either as a human or a deva in a heavenly plane.

65. At this point all of the perfections have been completed. These include the perfections of:
generosity, morality, renunciation, wisdom, energy, patience, truthfulness, determination, lovingkindness,
and equanimity. You have performed and perfected all of these perfections by this
point. You are very generous, moral, able to restrain, wise, full of energy, patient, truthful, full
of determination, and full of loving-kindness and equanimity.


66. One continues the practice and enters the seventh jhana of no-thingness.

67. One continues the practice and enters the eighth jhana of neither perception nor nonperception.

68. Compassion is very strong and one feels no animosity for others at this point.

69. You lose interest in criticizing others.

70. You tend to notice the similarities, rather than the differences between people.


**********to be continued***********
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David's Book :The Step-by-Step Guide #71 - #84

Postby yawares » Tue Oct 23, 2012 12:28 pm

Dear Members,

This lovely Uposatha Day is so right for me to read 'step-by-step guide'.

*********
David's Book :The Step-by-Step Guide to Awakening
[By Dr.David N. Snyder]


71. One further develops the brahma-vihara of joy with others. One has sympathetic joy where
one feels happy at the joy experienced by others. One is no longer jealous or feels any envy for
others.

72. Anger is completely eliminated. One may still display some anger, for example, to make a
point when someone has done something seriously wrong, but the mind will not be filled with
agitation and heat. The Buddha and Jesus both still displayed anger to make a point, for
example, when there were people exchanging money in the temple in the story in the New
Testament and Jesus storms through over-turning the tables. Ill-will towards others, including
hatred is completely eradicated.

73. Attachment to sense desires is completely eliminated. One does not find it necessary to
engage in many entertainment functions to have ―fun or pleasure. One finds more interest in
the Dhamma and associating with people who are also on the Dhamma Path.

74. You now have a tendency to live in the present moment, not dwelling on what is past or
speculating on the future.

75. One gains an insight into the universality of impermanence, suffering, and no-self. One sees
that these characteristics are true for all time periods and all world systems of the universe. You
can see things arising and passing away very clearly down to microseconds and nanoseconds.
This is the insight that puts you to the stage of non-returner. You have now completely
eliminated the first five of the ten hindrances to enlightenment. You are guaranteed not to
return to earth or any other worldly existence. You will be re-born to a heavenly plane and
realize full enlightenment there. This is another ―safe haven and you can not regress to a lower
level either in this life or the final future life.

76. One continues the practice and enters the ninth jhana of cessation.

77. One is very close to full enlightenment, but there are still some defilements left in the mind.
As one meditates, some of the defilements may arise. One puts equanimity toward the
defilement and it is released, one at a time. A subtle craving for existence or craving for
existence in a pleasant heavenly realm is eradicated through an equanimous meditation.

78. Craving for non-existence or existence in a formless heavenly realm is eradicated through an
equanimous meditation.

79. At this point, even at this advanced stage, there can still be some residual feelings of ego and
conceit. This is because you may feel that you are more spiritually advanced and therefore,
better than others. As this hindrance arises one is able to eradicate this hindrance once and for
all.

80. One is so close to full enlightenment that one may still have restlessness in an extreme effort
to attain the final goal. One practices patience and equanimity and eradicates this hindrance.

81. One is able to remain mindful and equanimous for long periods. During meditation sessions
one is able to enter any of the jhanas at will and very easily.

82. One gains insight into noble fruition right understanding, which reviews all the defilements
and hindrances. All of the hindrances except the final one have been eradicated, but there are
still ―embers of the defilements and these are cooled.

83. One gains insight into reviewing consciousness right understanding, which is compared to
―splashing water on the embers thus, completely extinguishing all defilements.

84. Your concentration is very strong and you may have previously had meditation sessions
where several enlightenment factors were present in you. But now you are able to obtain all
seven enlightenment factors, simultaneously. While all seven enlightenment factors are present,
you take nibbana as your meditation subject as an object of consciousness. The final hindrance
of ignorance is eliminated. One sees nibbana very clearly and remains in a ―state of nibbana for
a long time. One reviews the insight wisdom learned from the above insights. Through the
power of the mind one sees beings arise and pass away. One can see the past lives of others as
well as one‘s own past lives. One sees the truth of suffering and the cessation of suffering,
completely from experience. One sees the workings of Dependent Origination backwards and
forwards and the rest of the Dhamma teachings from a very clear experience. At this point one is
a fully enlightened arahant, the task is completed and the goal is completed. A fully enlightened
arahant no longer needs to sit in meditation, but does so anyway to lead by a good example.
There is mindfulness and equanimity all the time, during sitting meditation or not, but out of
compassion for others, the arahant continues to sit with others and teach.

The above guide lists 84 steps to full and complete enlightenment. This is just a guide, which is
based on the teachings of the Buddha and may not represent the exact step-by-step procedure
for everyone. Some of the steps may take a slightly different order for some people. The order
of the jhanas, insights, hindrances to enlightenment and types of right understanding are directly
from the Buddha‘s teachings with no deviations or new interpretations.
Although there are only 84 steps listed, it must be remembered that each step can take years
to complete, especially the latter steps. The Buddha went through many lifetimes in animal,
deva (angel), and human forms working on the ten perfections and the steps to enlightenment. It
is not something that can just be achieved in a few months or even a few years of practice. The
Buddha spent six years working on enlightenment after he left the palace. But we must not
forget the time he spent in past lives working on the steps. For these reasons we must be very
cautious and skeptical of anyone, including teachers who claim full and complete enlightenment.
There can be teachers and lay people, however, who have attained to the level of stream-entrant,
once-returner, or non-returner. But at the same time we should still strive for full and complete
enlightenment, for the benefit of all beings, to eradicate suffering and bring true peace to the
world.
May you attain full and complete enlightenment. May you be well, happy, and peaceful. May
all beings in the universe be well, happy, and peaceful.

******to be continued***********
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David's Book: Buddha’ Lists: Over 600 Lists

Postby yawares » Wed Oct 24, 2012 12:53 pm

Dear Members,

David's Book: Buddha’ Lists: Over 600 Lists
[By Dr. David N. Snyder]


The first part of this book (the preceding chapters) outlined the major doctrines of Buddhist
theory pointing to the logic and science of the teachings, providing evidence that the Path is
something worth proceeding on. After that it is our practice along the Path that will make the
doctrines clear from an experiential way, which is the only way to truly accept and discover the
Buddha‘s Path. After we become advanced in the practice and learn the many lists of analysis
either from study or practice or hopefully both, then we can refer back to all the lists so that our
memory may be strong so that we will be able to discuss the Dhamma with others properly, thus,
giving Right View to others.

Included here are all the lists discussed in the previous chapters, plus some other important lists
of the Buddha. There are a total of over 600 lists in this chapter. In this chapter you will find
most of the lists of the Buddha from the Pali Canon, but even with this high number of over 600
lists, there are still many that are not included. This is because there are just too many lists that
only the most important ones are placed in here and also there is a lot of repetition in the Pali
Canon. Some of the repetition is included here to show that nothing important is missed, but still
not all of the repetition used in the Pali Canon is included in this chapter. For example, you will
see some lists that are identical to others, with just a small change in the way they are described
or how two or more different lists use the same concepts or things. Some lists combine two or
more lists into a new category and a few of the important ones are shown here too. There are
many similes in the Buddha‘s teachings and there were lists with those stories too and they are
not included either as they refer to the teachings only be analogy. Most of the lists here show
their source or if not showing, it is most likely to be found in the Anguttara Nikaya, which is the
Numerical Discourses of the Buddha. More lists may be found in The Dhamma Encyclopedia
(see the last page of this chapter for information about this encyclopedia).

List no. 1
Zero or the void, nothingness. This is one of the ―heavenly planes of existence mentioned in
the Buddhist cosmology (but most definitely not nibbana, not enlightenment).
(from Anguttara Nikaya 9.36)

List no. 2
Zero things to cling to. Nothing is worth clinging to, not even the Dhamma. The teachings are
like a raft which take you to the other shore, but once there, you do not need to continue carrying
the raft on your shoulders (similie of the raft).
(from Samyutta Nikaya 50)
0.00024414

List no. 3
The above number put in fractional form is 1 / 4,096. One atom is considered 1 / 4,096 of a
ratharenu. A ratharenu is the smallest particle of dust you can see in a sunbeam. The term for
the modern atom was paramanu. Analysis of matter in the Abhidhamma was taken all the way
down to this level.
1

List no. 4
The One Absolute Reality: Nibbana (Enlightenment)
(from Dhammapada 203)

List no. 5
The One Prerequisite to being a Brahmin: Not harming or causing to harm or kill any living
being.
(from Dhammapada 405)

***********to be continued*************
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David's Book : Buddha' Lists #6 - #25

Postby yawares » Thu Oct 25, 2012 11:54 am

Dear Members,

David's Book : Buddha' Lists #6 - #25
[By Dr.David N. Snyder]


List no. 6
The One thing needed by all beings:
Food
(from Khp. 4)

List no. 7
The one quality leading to good states here and the hereafter:
Heedfulness with regard to skillful qualities

(from Iti. 23)

List no. 8
The one taste of the Dhamma:
Release (freedom)

(from Udana 5.5)

List no. 9
The one evil deed which can lead to so many more:
A deliberate lie

(from Iti. 25)

List no. 10
The one thing that enslaves one‘s heart so powerfully:
Lust
(from Iti. 1-6)

List no. 11
The one thing that of such power that causes the arising of lust:
The feature of beauty
(from Iti. 1-6)

List no. 12
The one thing that causes the arising of malevolence or to cause it to increase:
The repulsive feature of things
(from Iti. 1-6)

List no. 13
The one thing that of such power that causes the arising of sloth and torpor:
Regret

(from Iti. 1-6)

List no. 14
The one thing that of such power that causes the arising of excitement-and-flurry:
Non-tranqulity of mind
(from Iti. 1-6)

List no. 15
The one thing that of such power that causes the arising of doubt and wavering:
Unsystematic attention
(from Iti. 1-6)

List no. 16
The one thing that of such power to prevent the arising of sensual lust:
The feature of ugliness in things
(from Iti. 1-6)

List no. 17
The one thing that of such power to prevent the arising of malevolence:
The heart‘s release through amity

(from Iti. 1-6)

List no. 18
The one thing that of such power to prevent the arising of sloth and torpor:
Putting forth effort, exertion, striving
(from Iti. 1-6)

List no. 19
The one thing that of such power to prevent the arising of excitement-and-flurry:
Tranquility of mind

(from Iti. 1-6)

List no. 20
The one thing that of such power to prevent the arising of doubt and wavering:
Systematic attention
(from Iti. 1-6)

List no. 21
The one thing that of such power that causes the arising of unwholesome states:
Negligence
(from Iti. 1-6)

List no. 22
The one thing that of such power that causes the arising of good states:
Earnestness

(from Iti. 1-6)

List no. 23
The two types of meditation:
1. Samatha; (serenity, calm, relaxation)
2. Vipassana; (Insight)

List no. 24
The two types of phenomena:
1. Mental [mental image] (nama)
2. Physical [label] (rupa)
(from Khp. 4)

List no. 25
Two kinds of gifts:
1. Gifts of material things
2. Gift of the Dhamma
(from Iti. 98, 100)
(The gift of Dhamma is superior)
:heart:

***********
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David's Book : Buddha’ Lists #26 - #40

Postby yawares » Fri Oct 26, 2012 1:35 pm

Dear Members,

David's Book : Buddha’ Lists #26 - #40
[By Dr.David N. Snyder]


List no. 26
Two kinds of sharing:
1. Sharing of material things
2. Sharing of the Dhamma
(from Iti. 98, 100)
(The sharing of Dhamma is superior)

List no. 27
Two kinds of assistance:
1. Assistance with material things
2. Assistance with the Dhamma
(Iti. 98, 100)
(The assistance with the Dhamma is superior)

List no. 28
Two kinds of bodily conduct:
1. To be pursued; unskillful mental qualities decline, and skillful mental qualities increase
2. To not be pursued; unskillful mental qualities increase, and skillful mental qualities decline
(from Digha Nikaya 21)

List no. 29
Two parts of a Dhamma discourse:
1. Seeing unwholesome states as unwholesome
2. Getting release from those states

List no. 30
Two ways a monk can live with ease:
1. Guarding the sense faculties
2. Moderation in food
(from Iti. 29)

List no. 31
Two types of equanimity:
1. To be pursued; unskillful mental qualities decline, and skillful mental qualities increase
2. To not be pursued; unskillful mental qualities increase, and skillful mental qualities decline
(from Digha Nikaya 21)

List no. 32
Two kinds of extreme views in regard to existence:
1. Everything exists
2. Everything does not exist
(from Samyutta Nikaya 12.15)

List no. 33
Two kinds of extreme views:
1. That the precepts and doctrine are the essence of the training
2. That there is no harm in indulgence in sense pleasures
(from Samyutta Nikaya 12.15, 56.11, Udana 6.8)

List no. 34
Two kinds of extreme practices:
1. Devotion to sense pleasures
2. Devotion to self-affliction
(from Samyutta Nikaya 12.15, 56.11, Udana 6.8)

List no. 35
Two types of fools:
1. The one who doesn't see his transgression as a transgression
2. The one who doesn't rightfully pardon another who has confessed his transgression
(from Anguttara Nikaya 2.21, 2.98)

List no. 36
Two types of wise people:
1. The one who sees his transgression as a transgression
2. The one who rightfully pardons another who has confessed his transgression
(from Anguttara Nikaya 2.21)

List no. 37
Two types of fools not living responsibly:
1. The one who takes up a burden that hasn't fallen to him
2. The one who doesn't take up a burden that has

List no. 38
Two types of wise people living responsibly:
(Same as above, reversed, for example, ―doesn‘t beomes ―does or ―hasn‘t to ―has)

List no. 39
Two bright qualities that guard the world:
1. Conscience
2. Concern for the results of unskillful actions

List no. 40
Two ways of getting to heaven:
1. Auspicious habits
2. Auspicious views

******to be continued********
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David's Book : Buddha' Lists #41 - #55

Postby yawares » Sat Oct 27, 2012 12:10 pm

Dear Members,

David's Book : :candle: Buddha' Lists #41 - #55 :candle:
[By Dr.David N. Snyder]


List no. 41
Two ways of getting to hell:
1. Unwholesome habits
2. Unwholesome views

List no. 42
Two ways leading to deprivation in hell:
1. One who, not living the celibate life, pretends to be one who lives the celibate life
2. One who groundlessly accuses one who lives the celibate life perfectly and purely of
uncelibate behavior

List no. 43
Two types of people with enlightenment / nibbana:
1. The one with fuel remaining (still alive, cognizant of pleasure and pain)
2. The one thus gone, paranibbana (after passing away)


(from Iti. 44)
List no. 44
Two benefits of cemetery contemplation:
1. Absence of greed, lust, desire, craving, urge, need, longing and discontent.
2. Fearlessness of death and thereby fearlessness of all.

List no. 45
Two truths
1. Conventional truth (mundane, ordinary)
2. Ultimate truth (supramundane, in the language of absolute truth)
(from Samyutta Nikaya 12.15, Milindapanha, Abhidhamma)


List no. 46
Two things that cause no remorse:
1. There is the case of the person who has done what is admirable, has done what is skillful, has
given protection to those in fear, and has done nothing that is unwholesome, savage, or
cruel
2. He knows that he has not done what is unwholesome, he feels no remorse
(from Iti. 30)

List no. 47
Two things that cause remorse:
(Same as above, reversed)
(from Iti. 30)

List no. 48
Two benefits from first two jhanas:
1. Ceasing of all pain (first jhana)
2. Ceasing of mental frustration (second jhana)
(from Samyutta Nikaya 48)

List no. 49
Two types of searches:
1. Ignoble search (delighting in sense pleasure, searching for it)
2. Noble search (seeking release from suffering)
(from Digha Nikaya 21, Majjhima Nikaya 26)


List no. 50
Two trains of thought for enlightened ones:
1. Thoughts of safety for all
2. Thoughts of seclusion
(from Iti. 38)

List no. 51
Two views:
1. The view of becoming
2. The view of non-becoming
(Majjhima Nikaya 11, Samyutta Nikaya 22.80)

List no. 52
Two views regarding a being:
1. The view of a being
2. The view of a non-being
(Majjhima Nikaya 11, Samyutta Nikaya 22.80)

List no. 53
Two ways of slander of the Buddha:
1. He who explains what was not said or spoken by the Tathagata as said or spoken by the
Tathagata
2. He who explains what was said or spoken by the Tathagata as not said or spoken by the
Tathagata
(from Anguttara Nikaya 2.23)

List no. 54
Two ways of slandering the Buddha regarding literal and inference interpretations of the
Dhamma:
1. He who explains a discourse whose meaning needs to be inferred as one whose meaning has
already been fully drawn out
2. He who explains a discourse whose meaning has already been fully drawn out as one whose
meaning needs to be inferred
(from Anguttara Nikaya 2.25)

List no. 55
Two things for a person to appropriately arouse the ending of the fermentations:
1. A sense of urgency and awe toward things that should inspire urgency and awe
2. Feeling urgency and awe, with appropriate exertion
(from Iti. 37)
:anjali:

******to be continued***********
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David's Book : Buddha’ Lists #56 - 65

Postby yawares » Sun Oct 28, 2012 1:13 pm

Dear Members,

David's Book : :candle: Buddha’ Lists: Over 600 Lists :candle:
[By Dr.David N. Snyder]

List no. 56
Two kinds of feeling:
1. Bodily feelings
2. Mental feelings
(from Samyutta Nikaya 36.22)

List no. 57
Two kinds of energy:
1. Bodily energy (Kayika-viriya)
2. Mental energy (Cetasika-viriya)

List no. 58
Two ways of acquiring energy:
1. Ordinary energy from diet and exercise (Pakati-viriya)
2. Energy developed by meditation (Bhavana-viriya)

List no. 59
Two kinds of people hard to find in the world:
1. One who will do a favor first
2. One who is grateful for a favor done


List no. 60
Two results of practicing with vigilance, diligence, intent, resolute, persistence, and
determination:
1. Enlightenment
2. Or if there is a remnant of clinging remaining, the state of non-returner


List no. 61
Two results of practicing complete mindfulness for at least seven days (full awareness such as
while on retreat, 24 hours per day, all seven days or more):
1. Enlightenment
2. Or if there is a remnant of clinging remaining, the state of non-returner
(from Majjhima Nikaya 10)

List no. 62
The two aniyata (indefinite rules):
The aniyata are two indefinite rules where a monk is accused of having committed an offence
with a woman in a screened (enclosed) or private place by a lay person. It is indefinite because
the final outcome depends on whether the monk acknowledges the offence. Benefit of the doubt
is given to the monk unless there is over-riding evidence. Thus it is not proper for a monk to be
alone with a woman, especially in screened or private places.
1. Should any bhikkhu sit in private, alone with a woman on a seat secluded enough to lend
itself (to sexual intercourse), so that a female lay follower whose word can be trusted, having
seen (them), might describe it as constituting any of three cases, entailing defeat, communal
meetings, or confession, then the bhikkhu, acknowledging having sat (there), may be dealt with
in line with any of the three cases, entailing defeat, communal meetings, or confession, or he
may be dealt with in line with whichever case the female lay follower whose word can be trusted
described. This case is indefinite.
2. In case a seat is not sufficiently secluded to lend itself (to sexual intercourse) but sufficiently
so to address lewd words to a woman, should any bhikkhu sit in private, alone with a woman on
such a seat, so that a female lay follower whose word can be trusted, having seen (them), might
describe it as constituting either of two cases, entailing communal meetings or confession, then
the bhikkhu, acknowledging having sat (there), may be dealt with in line with either of the two
cases, entailing communal meetings or confession, or he may be dealt with in line with
whichever case the female lay follower whose word can be trusted described. This case too is
indefinite.
(from the Vinaya Pitaka)

List no. 63
The three ways of feeling:
1. Pleasant
2. Painful
3. Neither pleasant nor painful (neutral)
(from Digha Nikaya 15)

List no. 64
The Triple Gem:
1. Buddha
2. Dhamma (Buddha‘s teachings, Truth)
3. Sangha (Community)
(from Anguttara Nikaya 11.12)

List no. 65
:heart: :candle: The Threefold summary of the Buddha‘s teachings:
1. Avoid all evil,
2. Cultivate the good,
3. Purify your mind.

(from the Dhammapada, verse 183) :heart: :candle:
******to be continued*********** :anjali:
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David's Book : Buddha' Lists #66 - #76

Postby yawares » Mon Oct 29, 2012 11:51 am

Dear Members,

David's Book : :candle: Buddha' Lists #66 - #76 :candle:
[By Dr.David N. Snyder]


List no. 66
The Threefold summary of the Eightfold Middle Path:
1. Wisdom
2. Morality
3. Concentration
(from Samyutta Nikaya 12.65)


List no. 67
The Three Characteristics of Existence:
1. Suffering
2. Impermanence
3. No permanent self

List no. 68
The Three Realms of Existence:
1. Realm of sense world
2. Realm of Form
3. Realm of the Form-less

List no. 69
The Three ways a fool can be known by:
1. His conduct in deed.
2. His conduct in word.
3. His conduct in thought.
(from Anguttara Nikaya 3.2)

List no. 70
:heart: The Three ways a wise man can be known by:
1. His conduct in deed.
2. His conduct in word.
3. His conduct in thought.

(from Anguttara Nikaya 3.2) :heart:

List no. 71
The Three root causes of the origination of (negative)
kamma:
1. Greed (attachment)
2. Hatred (aversion)
3. Ignorance (delusion)
(Anguttara Nikaya 3.33)


List no. 72
Three qualities of the world, when arising, causing stress, harm, and suffering:
(Same as above)

List no. 73
Three defilements:
(Same as above)

List no. 74
The Three dangers from which a mother can not shield her son, nor the son his mother:
1. Old age
2. Disease
3. Death
(from Anguttara Nikaya 3.62)

List no. 75
:candle: The Three pillars or grounds for making merit:
1. Generosity
2. Moral restraint
3. Meditation
:candle:

List no. 76
The Three types of suffering:
1. Body or mental pain
2. Suffering that is inherent in formation – maintenance of body and things, oppressive nature of
continuous upkeep.
3. Suffering of change – pleasant and happy conditions in life are not permanent.
(from Samyutta Nikaya 38.14)

******to be continued***********
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David's Book : Buddha' Lists #77 - #90

Postby yawares » Tue Oct 30, 2012 12:58 pm

Dear Members,

David's Book : :candle: Buddha' Lists #77 - #90 :candle:
[By Dr.David N. Snyder]


List no. 77
The three parts (―baskets) of the Tipitaka (Pali Canon):
1. Sutta Pitaka (Discourses)
2. Vinaya Pitaka (Code of conduct/rules for monastics)
3. Abhidhamma Pitaka (Higher, scientific, psychological teachings)

List no. 78
The three parts of the Vinaya (rules for monastics):
1. Suttavibhanga -- the basic rules of conduct (Patimokkha) for bhikkhus and bhikkhunis, along
with the origin story/reason for each one.
2. Khandhaka – (i) Mahavagga -- rules of conduct and etiquette and historical information. (ii)
Cullavagga – elaboration of etiquette and duties and rules and procedures
3. Parivara -- summaries

List no. 79
The three made-up acquisitions of self:
1. The gross acquisition of a self
2. The mind-made acquisition of a self
3. The formless acquisition of a self

(from Digha Nikaya 9)

List no. 80
Three forms of becoming:
1. Sensual becoming
2. Form becoming
3. Formless becoming
(from Samyutta Nikaya 12.2)

List no. 81
Three forms of bliss (reasons the intelligent and wise should guard their virtue):
1. Praise
2. Wealth
3. Rebirth to a good destination

(from Iti.76)

List no. 82
:heart: Three kinds of cleanliness:
1. Bodily cleanliness
2. Verbal cleanliness
3. Mental cleanliness
:heart:
(from Iti. 66)

List no. 83
Three types of craving:
1. Craving for sensuality
2. Craving for becoming
3. Craving for non-becoming
(from Iti. 58)

List no. 84
Properties of Dhamma:
1. Steadfastness of the Dhamma
2. The orderliness of the Dhamma
3. All processes are inconstant, suffering, and all phenomena are not-self
(from Iti. 51)

List no. 85
Three divine sounds on these special occasions:
1. When one goes forth
2. When a disciple of the noble ones lives devoted to developing the seven [sets of] qualities that
are wings to Awakening
3. When a disciple of the noble ones attains full enlightenment

(from Iti. 82)

List no. 86
Three forms of suffering:
1. Pain
2. Fabrication
3. Change

(from Samyutta Nikaya 38.14)

List no. 87
Three escapes:
1. There is the escape from sensuality: renunciation
2. There is the escape from form: formlessness
3. There is an escape for whatever has come into being, is fabricated and dependently co-arisen,
the escape from that is cessation
(from Iti. 72)

List no. 88
Three eyes:
1. The eye of flesh
2. The divine eye (clairvoyance) :candle:
3. The eye of discernment

(from Iti. 61)

List no. 89
Three fabricated characteristics of what is fabricated:
1. Arising is discernible
2. Passing away is discernible
3. Alteration (literally, other-ness) while staying is discernible
(from Samyutta Nikaya 12.2, 41.6)

List no. 90
Three faculties:
1. The faculty of ―I am about to know what is not yet finally known‖
2. The faculty of final knowledge
3. The faculty of one who has finally known
(from Iti. 62)

----------to be continued-----------
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David's Book : Buddha' Lists #91 - #100

Postby yawares » Wed Oct 31, 2012 12:54 pm

Dear Members,

David's Book : :candle: Buddha' Lists #91 - #100 :candle:
[By Dr.David N. Snyder]


List no. 91
Three things that lead to the falling away of a monk in training:
1. There is the case where a monk in training enjoys activity, delights in activity, is intent on his
enjoyment of activity
2. He enjoys chatter, delights in chatter, is intent on his enjoyment of chatter
3. He enjoys sleep, delights in sleep, is intent on his enjoyment of sleep
(from Iti. 79)

List no. 92
Three things that do not lead to the falling away of a monk in training:
(Same as above, reversed)

List no. 93
Three forms of false Dhamma:
1. Unwholesome desires
2. Friendship with evil people
3. And, there being something further to be done, he nevertheless stops halfway with a lower
modicum of distinctive attainment
(from Iti. 89)

List no. 94
Three forms of good actions (regarding 1st precept):
1. He himself abstains from killing living beings
2. He exhorts others to abstain from killing living beings
3. He speaks in praise of abstinence from the killing of living beings
(from Samyutta Nikaya 55.7)

List no. 95
Three forms of good actions (regarding 2nd precept):
1. He will carefully avoid all taking what is not given
2. He will persuade others also to abstain from all stealing and theft
3. He will speak praising taking only what is freely and righteously given
(from Samyutta Nikaya 55.7)

List no. 96
Three forms of good actions (regarding 3rd precept):
1. He will carefully avoid all adultery, sexual and sensual abuse
2. He will persuade others also to abstain from all adultery and sexual abuse
3. He will speak praising behaving faithfully, loyal, in trustworthy fidelity
(from Samyutta Nikaya 55.7)


List no. 97
Three forms of good actions (regarding 4th precept):
1. He will carefully avoid all false speech, deception, and deceitfulness
2. He will persuade others also to abstain from all false speech and lying
3. He will praise speaking only honest, trustworthy, plain, straight truth

(from Samyutta Nikaya 55.7)

List no. 98
Three ways to avoid splitting speech:
1. He will carefully avoid all divisive, splitting, disruptive, and evil speech
2. He will persuade others also to abstain from all divisive wrong speech
3. He will praise speaking only harmony that unites friends and even foes
(from Samyutta Nikaya 55.7)

List no. 99
Three ways to avoid harsh speech:
1. He will carefully avoid all harsh, abusive, aggressive, and offensive speech
2. He will persuade others also to abstain from all insulting and malign speech
3. He will praise speaking only kind and gentle words worth remembering

(from Samyutta Nikaya 55.7)

List no. 100
Three ways to avoid gossipping:
1. He will carefully avoid all gossip, idle chatter, empty babble, and void hearsay
2. He will persuade others also to avoid all pointless good-for-nothing speech
3. He will praise speaking well formulated reasoned facts worth remembering

(from Samyutta Nikaya 55.7)

-------------to be continued-----
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David's Book : Buddha' Lists #101 - #110

Postby yawares » Thu Nov 01, 2012 12:33 pm

Dear Members,

David's Book : :candle: Buddha' Lists #101 - #110 :candle:
[By Dr.David N. Snyder]


List no. 101
Three fermentations:
1. The fermentation of sense pleasures
2. The fermentation of becoming
3. The fermentation of ignorance
(from Iti. 56, 57)

List no. 102
Three fires:
1. The fire of passion
2. The fire of aversion
3. The fire of delusion

(from Iti. 93)

List no. 103
Three governing principles:
1. The self as a governing principle
2. The cosmos as a governing principle
3. The Dhamma as a governing principle
(from Anguttara Nikaya 3.40)

List no. 104
Three grounds for meritorious activity:
1. The ground for meritorious activity made of giving
2. The ground for meritorious activity made of virtue
3. The ground for meritorious activity made of development (meditation)

(from Iti. 60)

List no. 105
Three forms of intoxification:
1. Intoxication with youth
2. Intoxication with health
3. Intoxication with life
(from Anguttara Nikaya 3.38)

List no. 106
Three modes of investigation:
1. There is the case where a monk investigates in terms of properties
2. Investigates in terms of sense spheres
3. Investigates in terms of dependent co-arising
(from Samyutta Nikaya 22.57)

List no. 107
Three types of miracles:
1. The miracle of psychic power
2. The miracle of telepathy
3. The miracle of instruction
(The miracle of instruction is highest.)

(from Digha Nikaya 11, Anguttara Nikaya 3.60)

List no. 108
Three types of people:
1. There is the case of the person who — regardless of whether he does or doesn't get to see the
Tathagata, regardless of whether he does or doesn't get to hear the Dhamma and Discipline
proclaimed by the Tathagata — will not alight on the lawfulness, the rightness of skillful mental
qualities.
2. There is the case of the person who — regardless of whether he does or doesn't get to see the
Tathagata, regardless of whether he does or doesn't get to hear the Dhamma and Discipline
proclaimed by the Tathagata — will alight on the lawfulness, the rightness of skillful mental
qualities.
3. There is the case of the person who will alight on the lawfulness, the rightness of skillful
mental qualities if he gets to see the Tathagata and gets to hear the Dhamma and Discipline
proclaimed by the Tathagata, but not if he doesn't.
[―Now, it is because of the person who will alight on the lawfulness, the rightness of skillful
mental qualities if he gets to see the Tathagata and gets to hear the Dhamma and Discipline
proclaimed by the Tathagata — but not if he doesn't — that the teaching of the Dhamma has
been allowed. And it is because there is this sort of person that the other sorts of persons are to
be taught the Dhamma as well (on the chance that they may actually turn out to need and benefit
from the teaching). Anguttara Nikaya 3.22]

List no. 109
Three types of people regarding generosity:
1. One like a cloud without rain (not generous)
2. One who rains locally (generous only to the immediate family or community)
3. One who rains everywhere (generous to all regardless of community, borders)
(from Iti. 84)

List no. 110
Three persons, appearing in the world, for the benefit of many:
1. A Tathagata (fully enlightened Buddha)
2. A worthy teacher
3. A disciple of a worthy teacher who is endowed with good practices and principles

(from Iti. 84)

--------to be continued---------------
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David's Book : Buddha' Lists #111 - #120

Postby yawares » Fri Nov 02, 2012 12:08 pm

Dear Members,

:candle: David's Book : Buddha' Lists #111 - #120 :candle:
[By Dr.David N. Snyder]


List no. 111
Three properties:
1. The property of form
2. The property of formlessness
3. The property of cessation
(from Iti. 51)

List no. 112
Three qualities of a monk which pass beyond Mara's domain and shine like the sun:
1. There is the case where a monk is endowed with the aggregate of virtue of one beyond
training
2. The aggregate of concentration of one beyond training
3. The aggregate of discernment of one beyond training

(from Iti. 59)

List no. 113
Three forms of sagacity:
1. Bodily sagacity
2. Verbal sagacity
3. Mental sagacity
(from Anguttara Nikaya 3.120)

List no. 114
Three types of searches:
1. The search for sense pleasures
2. The search for becoming
3. The search for a holy life
(from Iti. 54, 55)

List no. 115
Three sectarian views that are rebuked by wise people:
1. There are priests and contemplatives who hold this teaching, hold this view: 'Whatever a
person experiences — pleasant, painful, or neither pleasant nor painful — that is all caused by
what was done in the past.'
2. There are priests and contemplatives who hold this teaching, hold this view: 'Whatever a
person experiences — pleasant, painful, or neither pleasant nor painful — that is all caused by a
supreme being's act of creation.'
3. There are priests and contemplatives who hold this teaching, hold this view: 'Whatever a
person experiences — pleasant, painful, or neither pleasant nor painful — that is all without
cause and without condition.
(from Anguttara Nikaya 3.61)

List no. 116
Three ways of sense pleasures in the deva worlds:
1. Those whose sensual pleasures are already provided
2. Those who delight in creating
3. Those with control over what is created by others

(from Iti. 95)

List no. 117
Three types of sons and daughters:
1. One of heightened birth: parents do not follow Dhamma, but child does
2. One of similar birth: both parents and child follow Dhamma
3. One of lowered birth: parents follow Dhamma, but child does not

(from Iti. 74)

List no. 118
Three objects of supreme confidence:
1. Tathagata (Buddha)
2. The quality of dispassion for realizing nibbana
3. The Noble Eightfold Middle Path

(from Iti. 90)

List no. 119
Three themes one should attend the mind to periodically:
1. Concentration
2. Energy
3. Equanimity

(from Anguttara Nikaya 3.100)

List no. 120
Three kinds of skillful thinking that lead to knowledge:
1. Thinking imbued with renunciation
2. Thinking imbued with non-ill-will
3. Thinking imbued with harmlessness

(from Iti. 87)

--------to be continued---------------
yawares :anjali:
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