Is correct gratitude as layperson emulating monastics?

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Is correct gratitude as layperson emulating monastics?

Postby dhammapal » Wed Jan 22, 2014 9:46 am

Hi,
Ajahn Sucitto wrote:Mudita is connected to anumodana, which is the chant we do in the monastery for the acts of offering that sustain us. It is an act of rejoicing: 'You've done some good kamma - —that's wonderful. Don't overlook this. Please reflect on your goodness so that you feel good.' This gives rise to gratitude and contentment.
From: Cultivating Empathy by Ajahn Sucitto

Can the practice of gratitude as a layperson emulate the above example from monastics?

Thanks / dhammapal.
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Re: Is correct gratitude as layperson emulating monastics?

Postby binocular » Wed Jan 22, 2014 10:05 am

What exactly do you mean?

That if someone gives you something, you tell that person to feel good about themselves?
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Re: Is correct gratitude as layperson emulating monastics?

Postby dhammapal » Wed Jan 22, 2014 10:19 am

Hi binocular,
binocular wrote:What exactly do you mean?

That if someone gives you something, you tell that person to feel good about themselves?

I found this on an AA site:
"Thank you" is a communication that we appreciated what someone else did. We like to be appreciated, and this is one way we can let someone else feel good.
http://web.archive.org/web/200609252242 ... mSorry.htm

With metta / dhammapal.
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Re: Is correct gratitude as layperson emulating monastics?

Postby Aloka » Wed Jan 22, 2014 10:26 am

dhammapal wrote:
Ajahn Sucitto wrote:Mudita is connected to anumodana, which is the chant we do in the monastery for the acts of offering that sustain us. It is an act of rejoicing: 'You've done some good kamma - —that's wonderful. Don't overlook this. Please reflect on your goodness so that you feel good.' This gives rise to gratitude and contentment.
From: Cultivating Empathy by Ajahn Sucitto

Can the practice of gratitude as a layperson emulate the above example from monastics?



Hi dhammapal,

I'm not sure what you mean - and I think its a good idea to to look at your quote in the context of the whole paragraph:


Muditā is the joy that is associated with sympathy, with appreciation. The analogy is of a parent seeing that the child is growing up, getting stronger, and being able to do things. ‘Very good. You can manage….’ It’s joyful: ‘I know what it’s like to feel strong and confident and upright and independent.’ Muditā is the joy, the appreciation of another’s – or one’s own – good fortune, strength or skilfulness. Muditā is connected to anumodana, which is the chant we do in the monastery for the acts of offering that sustain us. It is an act of rejoicing: ‘You’ve done some good kamma—that’s wonderful. Don’t overlook this. Please reflect on your goodness so that you feel good.’ This gives rise to gratitude and contentment.


Kind regards,

Aloka
Last edited by Aloka on Wed Jan 22, 2014 10:33 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Is correct gratitude as layperson emulating monastics?

Postby binocular » Wed Jan 22, 2014 10:27 am

I once found this instruction for how to express gratitude that I find very useful:

Never take more than you need.
Use all that you take.
Thank the person for the gifted thing or favor, and tell them how you have used or will use the gifted thing or favor.

Personally, what makes me feel good about giving people things or doing favors to them is to know that they plan to use them well, or even better, that they already have used them well.
A thank-you is appreciated, but it's much better to know that the resources and favors one has given others or done for others have been used well.
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Re: Is correct gratitude as layperson emulating monastics?

Postby Aloka » Wed Jan 22, 2014 10:32 am

binocular wrote:I once found this instruction for how to express gratitude that I find very useful:

Never take more than you need.
Use all that you take.
Thank the person for the gifted thing or favor, and tell them how you have used or will use the gifted thing or favor.



Source ?


.
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Re: Is correct gratitude as layperson emulating monastics?

Postby binocular » Wed Jan 22, 2014 10:56 am

I don't remember.
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