The Dhamma Wheel Memorization Challenge

A discussion on all aspects of Theravāda Buddhism

Re: The Dhamma Wheel Memorization Challenge

Postby Cittasanto » Wed May 30, 2012 7:50 pm

I came accross these on Access to insight, awhile ago, and can not remember exactly where they are from or what page (maybe befriending the suttas??)

"Thus you should train yourselves: 'We will lend ear when discourses which are the words of the Authentic One;
profound in their meaning, transcendent, and connected with emptiness are being recited. We will lend ear, will set
our mind on understanding them, and
shall regard these words as those things worthwhile grasping & mastering
.'
That's how you should train yourselves."

Endowed with six qualities, a person is capable of aligning with lawfulness, upright of skilful mental qualities even
while listening to the true Dhamma. Which six?
"When the Truth & Deportment declared by the Authentic One is being taught, they listen well,
gives ear, apply their mind to understanding, reject the worthless, grasps the worthwhile, and is capable of being
patience to conform with the teaching.

not exactly on memorization, apart from the grasping aspect, but hopefully useful!

I am almost finished rememorizing the Dhammachakkapavatana sutta (only the devas to go through :) ) and did look at the Karaniya metta sutta in english, and I still remember it well!
This offering maybe right, or wrong, but it is one, the other, both, or neither!
With Metta
Upāsaka Cittasanto
Blog, - Some Suttas Translated, Ajahn Chah.
"Others will misconstrue reality due to their personal perspectives, doggedly holding onto and not easily discarding them; We shall not misconstrue reality due to our own personal perspectives, nor doggedly holding onto them, but will discard them easily. This effacement shall be done."
User avatar
Cittasanto
 
Posts: 5743
Joined: Tue Dec 30, 2008 10:31 pm
Location: Ellan Vannin

Re: The Dhamma Wheel Memorization Challenge

Postby dhammapal » Thu May 31, 2012 9:40 am

Hello Bhante,
BKh wrote:There is a good article here on memorizing verbatim text:
http://www.productivity501.com/how-to-m ... -text/294/

I find the method suggested there very helpful. Basically, you convert your text into a string of just the first letters and use it as a recall crutch. So the text I am working on now...
§27. "Bhikkhus, for a faithful disciple who is intent on fathoming the Teacher’s Dispensation, it is natural that he conduct himself thus: ‘The Blessed One is the Teacher, I am a disciple; the Blessed One knows, I do not know.’ For a faithful disciple who is intent on fathoming the Teacher’s Dispensation, the Teacher’s Dispensation is nourishing and refreshing."

Would become...
"B, f a f d w i i o f t T’s D, i i n t h c h t: ‘T B O i t T, I a a d; t B O k, I d n k.’ F a f d w i i o f t T’s D, t T’s D i n a r."

The idea is then that you are able to stretch your memory by filling in the rest of the words when you are at the middle stage of the process: sort of know it but not really completely.

There is a tool on that page that will create this version. On this page: http://www.downes.ca/memorization.htm is just the tool. If you want you can do a "save as" for that page and keep it on your computer.

I'm using An Approach to Extended Memorization of The Tipitaka Adopted from Dr Andrew M. Davis,
to memorize Snp4.14 Tuvataka Sutta (10 lines so far (out of 41) with one new line each day):
Snp 4.14 transl. Thanissaro wrote:"I ask the kinsman of the Sun, the great seer, about seclusion & the state of peace.
Seeing in what way is a monk unbound, clinging to nothing in the world?"
"He should put an entire stop to the root of objectification-classifications: 'I am the thinker.'[1]
He should train, always mindful, to subdue any craving inside him.
Whatever truth he may know, within or without, he shouldn't get entrenched in connection with it,
for that isn't called Unbinding by the good.
He shouldn't, because of it, think himself better, lower, or equal.
Touched by contact in various ways, he shouldn't keep conjuring self.
Stilled right within, a monk shouldn't seek peace from another from anything else.
For one stilled right within, there's nothing embraced, so how rejected?"
Tuvataka Sutta (Sutta Nipata 4.14)

With metta / dhammapal.
dhammapal
 
Posts: 667
Joined: Sun Nov 01, 2009 9:23 am
Location: Sydney, Australia

Re: The Dhamma Wheel Memorization Challenge

Postby Sekha » Thu May 31, 2012 11:38 am

There has been some work done in order to help people memorizing in Pali (or English with Pali words) the instructions that the Buddha repeated the most in the suttas. Each Pali word has a bubble with its definition in it. The list is far from being exhaustive, but it is getting completed slowly:

http://www.buddha-vacana.org/formulae.html

There is also this page for the Dhammacak':
http://www.buddha-vacana.org/sutta/samy ... 6-011.html

This sutta is interesting to memorize because it has a definition of each factor of the 8-fold path:
http://www.buddha-vacana.org/sutta/samy ... 5-008.html

This one has an exposition of paticca samuppada with a definition of each term:
http://www.buddha-vacana.org/sutta/samy ... 2-002.html

This one is very easy and very useful to memorize for anyone wishing to have a successful meditation practice:
http://www.buddha-vacana.org/sutta/angu ... 6-118.html

:anjali:
Where knowledge ends, religion begins. - B. Disraeli

http://www.buddha-vacana.org
User avatar
Sekha
 
Posts: 746
Joined: Wed Jan 20, 2010 12:32 am
Location: French Guiana

Re: Aditthana – Memorize the Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta

Postby James the Giant » Sun Jan 06, 2013 2:25 pm

Best wishes in your endeavour!
I seem to remember that sutta is a nice one to chant, there are some good repeated passages that form a nice rhythm.
During the rains retreat at Bodhinyanarama we chanted it most evenings for a few months, and by the end I could do it without reading from the book. Interestingly I could chant it with others, but not by myself. By myself I always got lost.
May your memory be well exercised :anjali:
Then,
saturated with joy,
you will put an end to suffering and stress.
SN 9.11
User avatar
James the Giant
 
Posts: 783
Joined: Sat Oct 17, 2009 6:41 am

Re: Aditthana – Memorize the Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta

Postby Ben » Sun Jan 06, 2013 2:32 pm

Well done KB on your aspiration. I have also thought about memorizing the Dhamma Cakka Pavatana, but because of work and family responsibilities, I was convinced I didn;t have the time. You might want to check out the sutta memorization challenge thread, and please feel free to either merge this thread with it or begin diarising in that thread. I will be very interested to know how you progress.
with metta and best wishes.

Ben
"One cannot step twice into the same river, nor can one grasp any mortal substance in a stable condition, but it scatters and again gathers; it forms and dissolves, and approaches and departs."

- Hereclitus


Compassionate Hands Foundation (Buddhist aid in Myanmar) • Buddhist Global ReliefUNHCR
Buddhist Life Stories of Australia

e: ben.dhammawheel@gmail.com
User avatar
Ben
Site Admin
 
Posts: 16076
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2008 12:49 am
Location: Land of the sleeping gods

Re: Aditthana – Memorize the Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta

Postby gavesako » Sun Jan 06, 2013 3:29 pm

It is much easier to memorize a discourse like this while chanting together (sam+gayana) in a group. There is a rhythm to the chant and when you need to stop to take a breath, others continue chanting. Group recitation has been the way the Sangha has preserved the Suttas for centuries.
Bhikkhu Gavesako
Kiṃkusalagavesī anuttaraṃ santivarapadaṃ pariyesamāno... (MN 26)

ajahnchah.org - Teachings of Ajahn Chah in many languages
Dhammatube - Videos on Buddhist practice
Ancient Buddhist Texts - Translations and history of Pali texts
User avatar
gavesako
 
Posts: 1384
Joined: Sun Jan 04, 2009 5:16 pm
Location: England

Re: Aditthana – Memorize the Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta

Postby Khalil Bodhi » Sun Jan 06, 2013 5:10 pm

Ben wrote:Well done KB on your aspiration. I have also thought about memorizing the Dhamma Cakka Pavatana, but because of work and family responsibilities, I was convinced I didn;t have the time. You might want to check out the sutta memorization challenge thread, and please feel free to either merge this thread with it or begin diarising in that thread. I will be very interested to know how you progress.
with metta and best wishes.

Ben


I'll merge it Ben, thanks for the heads up. I'll keep you posted! Mettaya!
To avoid all evil, to cultivate good, and to cleanse one's mind — this is the teaching of the Buddhas.
-Dhp. 183

Uposatha Observance Club:http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=148031379279&v=info
Kiva-Theravada Buddhists:http://www.kiva.org/team/theravada_buddhists
Dana on the Interwebs:
http://greatergood.com
http://freerice.com
User avatar
Khalil Bodhi
 
Posts: 1630
Joined: Tue Feb 03, 2009 6:32 pm
Location: NYC

Re: Aditthana – Memorize the Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta

Postby Khalil Bodhi » Sun Jan 06, 2013 5:29 pm

gavesako wrote:It is much easier to memorize a discourse like this while chanting together (sam+gayana) in a group. There is a rhythm to the chant and when you need to stop to take a breath, others continue chanting. Group recitation has been the way the Sangha has preserved the Suttas for centuries.


Bhante,

Yes, I understand this completely. This is why I'm using the recording of Dhamma Ruwan. I wish I had a group with whom to recite but their is only my lay group here. Thank you!
To avoid all evil, to cultivate good, and to cleanse one's mind — this is the teaching of the Buddhas.
-Dhp. 183

Uposatha Observance Club:http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=148031379279&v=info
Kiva-Theravada Buddhists:http://www.kiva.org/team/theravada_buddhists
Dana on the Interwebs:
http://greatergood.com
http://freerice.com
User avatar
Khalil Bodhi
 
Posts: 1630
Joined: Tue Feb 03, 2009 6:32 pm
Location: NYC

Re: Aditthana – Memorize the Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta

Postby Cittasanto » Sun Jan 06, 2013 6:31 pm

Khalil Bodhi wrote:
gavesako wrote:It is much easier to memorize a discourse like this while chanting together (sam+gayana) in a group. There is a rhythm to the chant and when you need to stop to take a breath, others continue chanting. Group recitation has been the way the Sangha has preserved the Suttas for centuries.


Bhante,

Yes, I understand this completely. This is why I'm using the recording of Dhamma Ruwan. I wish I had a group with whom to recite but their is only my lay group here. Thank you!

Hi Khalil,
where is your OP?
I was going to have a look at the link in it.
This offering maybe right, or wrong, but it is one, the other, both, or neither!
With Metta
Upāsaka Cittasanto
Blog, - Some Suttas Translated, Ajahn Chah.
"Others will misconstrue reality due to their personal perspectives, doggedly holding onto and not easily discarding them; We shall not misconstrue reality due to our own personal perspectives, nor doggedly holding onto them, but will discard them easily. This effacement shall be done."
User avatar
Cittasanto
 
Posts: 5743
Joined: Tue Dec 30, 2008 10:31 pm
Location: Ellan Vannin

Re: The Dhamma Wheel Memorization Challenge

Postby Khalil Bodhi » Thu Jan 10, 2013 1:48 pm

Hi Everyone,

Just in case anyone was wondering, my aditthana is still going strong. To help myself I have put together a lst of resources in Pali and English to help me not only memorize the Dhammacakkappavattana sutta but, dare I say, to understand it. I have actually decided to pay to host the files in case whoever is serving them up now goes under later. Please let me know if you have more to add and I will update the page accordingly: http://khalilbodhi.wordpress.com/daily-practice-outline/memorizing-the-dhammacakkappavattana-sutta/
To avoid all evil, to cultivate good, and to cleanse one's mind — this is the teaching of the Buddhas.
-Dhp. 183

Uposatha Observance Club:http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=148031379279&v=info
Kiva-Theravada Buddhists:http://www.kiva.org/team/theravada_buddhists
Dana on the Interwebs:
http://greatergood.com
http://freerice.com
User avatar
Khalil Bodhi
 
Posts: 1630
Joined: Tue Feb 03, 2009 6:32 pm
Location: NYC

Re: The Dhamma Wheel Memorization Challenge

Postby Sekha » Sat Jan 26, 2013 10:03 pm

Khalil Bodhi wrote:Hi Everyone,

Just in case anyone was wondering, my aditthana is still going strong. To help myself I have put together a lst of resources in Pali and English to help me not only memorize the Dhammacakkappavattana sutta but, dare I say, to understand it. I have actually decided to pay to host the files in case whoever is serving them up now goes under later. Please let me know if you have more to add and I will update the page accordingly: http://khalilbodhi.wordpress.com/daily-practice-outline/memorizing-the-dhammacakkappavattana-sutta/

If you want to understand every word of the Pali text, which will ease greatly the memorization process, I would recommend this resource, with an infobubble on every Pali word:
http://www.buddha-vacana.org/sutta/samy ... 6-011.html
Where knowledge ends, religion begins. - B. Disraeli

http://www.buddha-vacana.org
User avatar
Sekha
 
Posts: 746
Joined: Wed Jan 20, 2010 12:32 am
Location: French Guiana

Re: The Dhamma Wheel Memorization Challenge

Postby Khalil Bodhi » Sat Jan 26, 2013 10:28 pm

Thank you Sekha! I am working to memorize the Pali first and translating chunks of important sections for now. I definitely intend to do a line by line translation as I progress.
To avoid all evil, to cultivate good, and to cleanse one's mind — this is the teaching of the Buddhas.
-Dhp. 183

Uposatha Observance Club:http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=148031379279&v=info
Kiva-Theravada Buddhists:http://www.kiva.org/team/theravada_buddhists
Dana on the Interwebs:
http://greatergood.com
http://freerice.com
User avatar
Khalil Bodhi
 
Posts: 1630
Joined: Tue Feb 03, 2009 6:32 pm
Location: NYC

Re: The Dhamma Wheel Memorization Challenge

Postby theY » Wed Feb 06, 2013 5:48 am

Hi dears,

I use to memorize pāli and translate it word to word. I try to memorize by the fixed time. I don't care how much I had remember, but I care "Have I tried to memorize at all my fixed time?".

Memorization in everything-- pali, meaning, face, leg, satta, sabhāva, good, even though in bad thing, is the nearest cause of sati.

We should change the behavior of saññā. Don't stop it, because that acting is useless. We can't stop saññā.
Lesson Relationship of Abhidhammatthasaṅgaha (10/31/2012)
http://tipitakanews.org/en/node/61
theY
 
Posts: 101
Joined: Thu Sep 20, 2012 12:07 pm

Re: The Dhamma Wheel Memorization Challenge

Postby Javi » Mon Mar 25, 2013 3:51 am

For memorizing things, I'm a huge fan of using the 'method of loci', also known as the memory palace technique. It's an ancient technique that was used by the Greeks and Romans to memorize speeches. They are still used to today, especially by people who participate in modern "memory championships". The feats of memory these mental athletes can achieve by using simple techniques is amazing, and this is one of the main ways they do it. I highly recommend checking this out, it really works wonders.
Non qui parum habet sed qui plus cupit pauper est.
It's not he who has little, but he who craves more, that is poor. - Seneca
User avatar
Javi
 
Posts: 38
Joined: Thu Nov 22, 2012 5:40 pm
Location: Miami, Florida

Re: The Dhamma Wheel Memorization Challenge

Postby Coyote » Tue May 07, 2013 3:30 pm

I didn't actually get as far as I hoped in memorizing the karaniya metta sutta. But I am now looking at beginning again, maybe with something different this time.
So aside from the basic homages and refuges, what are some of the first chants that someone brought up as a buddhist might know or learn? Any ideas?
"If beings knew, as I know, the results of giving & sharing, they would not eat without having given, nor would the stain of miserliness overcome their minds. Even if it were their last bite, their last mouthful, they would not eat without having shared."
Iti 26
Coyote
 
Posts: 537
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 12:42 pm
Location: Wales - UK

Re: The Dhamma Wheel Memorization Challenge

Postby starter » Wed Jul 31, 2013 3:23 pm

Hi friends,

Since sharing of the following teaching has generated significant effect, I'm posting them here so that we can try to memorize these very important guidelines for our Dhamma practice, which I hope you don't mind reading again:

— From DN 16. Mahāparinibbāna Sutta —

To some of you, Ānanda, it may occur thus: 'The words of the Teacher have ended, there is a Teacher no longer'. But it should not, Ānanda, be so considered. Indeed, Ānanda, that which I have taught and made known to you as the Dhamma and the Vinaya will be your Teacher after my passing away.

— From SN 20.7 Āṇi Sutta —

In future time, there will be bhikkhus who will not listen to the utterance of such discourses which are words of the Tathāgata, profound, profound in meaning, leading beyond the world, (consistently) connected with emptiness, they will not lend ear, they will not apply their mind on knowledge, they will not consider those teachings as to be taken up and mastered.

On the contrary, they will listen to the utterance of such discourses which are literary compositions made by poets, witty words, witty letters, by people from outside, or the words of disciples, they will lend ear, they will apply their mind on knowledge, they will consider those teachings as to be taken up and mastered.

Thus, bhikkhus, the discourses which are words of the Tathāgata, profound, profound in meaning, leading beyond the world, (consistently) connected with emptiness, will disappear.

Therefore, bhikkhus, you should train thus: 'We will listen to the utterance of such discourses which are words of the Tathāgata, profound, profound in meaning, leading beyond the world, (consistently) connected with emptiness, we will lend ear, we will apply our mind on knowledge, we will consider those teachings as to be taken up and mastered.' This is how, bhikkhus, you should train yourselves.

[from http://www.buddha-vacana.org/]

— From SN 16.13 Saddhammapatirupaka Sutta: A Counterfeit of the True Dhamma —

"When beings are degenerating and the true Dhamma is disappearing, there are more training rules and yet fewer monks established in final gnosis. There is no disappearance of the true Dhamma as long as a counterfeit of the true Dhamma has not arisen in the world, but there is the disappearance of the true Dhamma when a counterfeit of the true Dhamma has arisen in the world. Just as there is no disappearance of gold as long as a counterfeit of gold has not arisen in the world, but there is the disappearance of gold when a counterfeit of gold has arisen in the world, in the same way there is no disappearance of the true Dhamma as long as a counterfeit of the true Dhamma has not arisen in the world, but there is the disappearance of the true Dhamma when a counterfeit of the true Dhamma has arisen in the world.

"It's not the earth property that makes the true Dhamma disappear. It's not the water property... the fire property... the wind property that makes the true Dhamma disappear. It's worthless people who arise right here [within the Sangha] who make the true Dhamma disappear. The true Dhamma doesn't disappear the way a boat sinks all at once.

"These five downward-leading qualities tend to the confusion and disappearance of the true Dhamma. Which five? There is the case where the monks, nuns, male lay followers, & female lay followers live without respect, without deference, for the Teacher. They live without respect, without deference, for the Dhamma... for the Sangha... for the Training... for concentration. These are the five downward-leading qualities that tend to the confusion and disappearance of the true Dhamma.

"But these five qualities tend to the stability, the non-confusion, the non-disappearance of the true Dhamma. Which five? There is the case where the monks, nuns, male lay followers, & female lay followers live with respect, with deference, for the Teacher. They live with respect, with deference, for the Dhamma... for the Sangha... for the Training... for concentration. These are the five qualities that tend to the stability, the non-confusion, the non-disappearance of the true Dhamma."

[from http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html]

Metta to all !

Starter
Last edited by starter on Fri Jun 13, 2014 3:22 am, edited 1 time in total.
starter
 
Posts: 848
Joined: Mon Jul 12, 2010 9:56 pm

Re: The Dhamma Wheel Memorization Challenge

Postby starter » Wed Aug 21, 2013 11:03 pm

SN 22.43 Attadiipaa Sutta: An Island to Oneself
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .wlsh.html

"Monks, be islands unto yourselves, be your own refuge, having no other; let the Dhamma be an island and a refuge to you, having no other. Those who are islands unto themselves... should investigate to the very heart of things: 'What is the source of sorrow, lamentation, pain, grief and despair? How do they arise?'

...

"But seeing the body's (the form's) impermanence, its change-ability, its waning, its ceasing, he says 'formerly as now, all bodies (forms) were impermanent and unsatisfactory, and subject to change.' Thus, seeing this as it really is, with perfect insight, he abandons all sorrow, lamentation, pain, grief and despair. He is not worried at their abandonment (With their abandonment he is not worried?), but unworried lives at ease, and thus living at ease he is said to be 'assuredly delivered.'" [Similarly with 'feelings,' 'perceptions,' 'volitions,' 'consciousness'].

I wish I could always remember this teaching and search inside instead of outside, and investigate to the very heart of sufferings: 'What is the source of sorrow, lamentation, pain, grief and despair? How do they arise?' (and how to abandon them?)

Happy Uposatha!

PS: a similar teaching by the Buddha in DN 16

"I, Ānanda, at present, am old, elderly, of great age, far gone, advanced in years, I am eighty years old. It is like, Ānanda, an old cart, which only keeps going when shored up with bamboo, just so, Ānanda, I think the Realised One’s body only keeps going when shored up with bamboo.

When the Realised One doesn’t pay attention, Ānanda, to any of the signs, when all feelings have ceased, he lives having established the signless mind-concentration, and at that time, Ānanda, the Realised One’s body is most comfortable.

Therefore, Ānanda, live with yourself as an island, yourself as a refuge, with no other refuge, with the Teaching as an island, the Teaching as a refuge, with no other refuge. And how, Ānanda, does a monk live with himself as an island, himself as a refuge, with no other refuge, with the Teaching as an island, the Teaching as a refuge, with no other refuge?

Here, Ānanda, a monk dwells contemplating the nature of the body in the body, ardent, fully aware, and mindful, after removing avarice and sorrow regarding the world; he dwells contemplating the nature of feelings in feelings, ardent, fully aware, and mindful, after removing avarice and sorrow regarding the world; he dwells contemplating the nature of the mind in the mind, ardent, fully aware, and mindful, after removing avarice and sorrow regarding the world; he dwells contemplating the nature of things in various things, ardent, fully aware, and mindful, after removing avarice and sorrow regarding the world.

Thus, Ānanda, a monk lives with himself as an island, himself as a refuge, with no other refuge, with the Teaching as an island, the Teaching as a refuge, with no other refuge. For whoever, Ānanda, whether at present or after my passing, lives with himself as an island, himself as a refuge, with no other refuge, with the Teaching as an island, the Teaching as a refuge, with no other refuge, those monks of mine, Ānanda, will go from darkness to the highest—whoever likes the training.”
Last edited by starter on Wed Apr 16, 2014 1:18 am, edited 1 time in total.
starter
 
Posts: 848
Joined: Mon Jul 12, 2010 9:56 pm

Re: The Dhamma Wheel Memorization Challenge

Postby starter » Sat Sep 14, 2013 12:23 am

I hope that the following teaching can be not only memorized by heart but also applied in daily practice:

"Monks, even if bandits were to carve you up savagely, limb by limb, with a two-handled saw, he who let his heart harbor hate toward them would not be carrying out my teaching. Even then you should train yourselves: 'Our hearts will be unaffected and we will say no evil words. We will remain compassionate, with a heart of loving kindness and good will, and with no inner hate. We will keep pervading these people with thoughts imbued with loving kindness and good will and, beginning with them, we will keep pervading the all-encompassing world with thoughts imbued with loving kindness and good will — abundant (like the great earth), exalted (like empty space), immeasurable (like the river Ganges), free from hostility and free from ill will (like the catskin bag).' This is how you should train yourselves."

"Monks, if you keep this admonition on the simile of the saw constantly in mind, do you see any any mode of speech, subtle or gross, that you could not endure?"

"No, Lord."

"Therefore, monks, you should keep this admonition on the Simile of the Saw constantly in mind. That will conduce to your long-term welfare & happiness."

(MN 21)

Metta to all!
Last edited by starter on Sat Dec 21, 2013 1:31 am, edited 1 time in total.
starter
 
Posts: 848
Joined: Mon Jul 12, 2010 9:56 pm

Re: The Dhamma Wheel Memorization Challenge

Postby starter » Thu Oct 03, 2013 2:34 am

I am trying to memorize the following teaching and practice metta accordingly:

May all beings (and I) be safe and secure;
May all beings (and I) be well and happy.
[May their (and my) heart be full of metta,
freed from anger, ill will, and hostility,
& be at peace.]

Whatever beings there are,
weak or strong, without exception,
great, medium, or small,
seen & unseen,
near or far,
born & unborn,
May all beings be well and happy!

Let no one deceive another,
Or despise anyone anywhere.
Or through anger or hate,
Wish harm upon another.

As a mother would risk her life
to protect her child, her only child,
even so should one cultivate an all-embracing loving heart
towards all beings.

With love and good will for all beings,
cultivate an all-embracing loving heart:
Radiate love to the entire cosmos:
Above, below, & all around,
unhindered (by defilements/hindrances), without ill will, without enmity.

Whether standing, walking,
sitting, or lying down,
as long as awake,
sustain this recollection.
This is said to be a sublime abiding
here & now.

From Sn 1.8 Karaniya Metta Sutta
(The translation is synthesized from various sources, mainly http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html)

Here is a more original translation of the sutta based on Bhante Ānandajoti's word to word breakdown translation: ttp://www.ancient-buddhist-texts.net/Te ... alysis.htm (with minor changes)

What should be done by one skilful in good,
who has comprehended the state of peace:
he ought to be able, straight, and upright,
easy to speak to, meek, not conceited,
content, easy to support,
with few duties, and living lightly,
with peaceful faculties, prudent, modest,
and no greed for supporters.

Do not do the slightest thing
that the wise would later censure.

(May all beings) be happy and secure, may all beings be happy in heart!
Whatsoever breathing beings there are
- weak, strong, or any other,
whether they be long or great, of middle size, short, tiny, or of compact (body),
those who are seen, and those who are unseen,
those who live far away, those who are near,
those who are born, and those who still seek birth
- may all beings in their hearts be happy!

No one should cheat another,
nor should he despise anyone anywhere,
he should not long for suffering for another
because of anger or resentment.
in the same way as a mother would protect her child,
her only child, with her life,
so toward all beings
he should develop the measureless thought (of friendliness).

Towards the whole world
he should develop the measureless thought of friendliness,
above, below, and all around,
without barriers, hate, or enemy.
Standing, walking, sitting, lying, for as long as he is without torpor,
he should be resolved on this mindfulness,
for this, they say here, is the Brahmam abiding.

without grasping views, virtuous,
and endowed with insight,
having removed greed for sense pleasures,
he will never come to lie in a womb again.

小部經集 I.8

慈經

一個善於修習善法,希望心境寧靜的人,
他應如是努力:
能幹、端正、直接、
善順易教、溫和、不骄慢、
知足、易養、
少俗務、生活淡薄簡樸、
諸根寂靜、谨言慎行、
謙虛、對供養者不貪。

不做任何
事後受智者指責之事。

(他應該要這樣發願:) 喜樂、平安,
願一切衆生心中充满喜樂。
一切衆生,無一例外,
無論軟弱、強壯、
長、大、
中等、短小、
精細、粗顯、
可見、不可見、
遠、近、
已出生的、將出生的:
願一切衆生心中充满喜樂。

願人們不相互欺騙、
不鄙視任何地方的任何人,
不以怒意、敵意,
願他人受苦。

如一位母親
舍命保護獨子,
他更應對一切衆生
修养無量之慈心。

以對全宇宙的善意,
散發無量之慈念:
充滿上方、下方,及橫遍十方,
沒有任何的障礙,沒有任何的仇恨及敵意。

無論站、行、
坐、臥,
凡清醒時,
他應當保持此念。
這稱為即時即地的
梵住之心。

不受觀念左右,
有戒德與,具足觀智,
滅除了感官貪欲,
他不再投胎。

集结http://nanda.online-dhamma.net/Tipitaka/Sutta/Khuddaka/Khuddaka-patha/Metta.htm (有修改)

Metta to all!
Last edited by starter on Fri Jan 31, 2014 1:28 am, edited 1 time in total.
starter
 
Posts: 848
Joined: Mon Jul 12, 2010 9:56 pm

Re: The Dhamma Wheel Memorization Challenge

Postby starter » Wed Jan 08, 2014 3:21 pm

Greetings!

I heard the following teaching again and have realized that we should really bear it in heart and apply the teaching to our own practice, instead of blindly follow the following four types of teachers:

1) “Here, monks, a monk might speak like this: ‘I have heard this directly from the Gracious One, friends, directly I learned it: “This is the Teaching, this is the Discipline, this is the Teacher’s Dispensation.”’ That monk’s speech, monks, is not to be rejoiced over, not to be scorned at. Without having rejoiced over it, without having scorned it, after learning those words and syllables well, they should be laid alongside the Discourses, they should be compared with the Discipline.

If, when these are laid alongside the Discourses, compared with the Discipline, they do not fit in with the Discourses, they do not compare well with the Discipline, you may here come to this conclusion: ‘Certainly this is not the Gracious One’s word, it is not well learned by that monk,’ and, monks, you should abandon it. If when these are laid alongside the Discourses, compared with the Discipline, they do fit in with the Discourses, they do compare well with the Discipline, you may come to this conclusion: ‘Certainly this is the Gracious One’s word, it is well-learned by that monk.’ This, monks, is the first Great Referral you should bear in mind.

2) Here, monks, a monk might speak like this: ‘In a certain dwelling place lives a Community with elders and leaders, I have heard this directly from that Community, directly I learned it: “This is the Teaching, this is the Discipline, this is the Teacher’s Dispensation.”’ Those monks’ speech, monks, is not to be rejoiced over, not to be scorned at. Without having rejoiced over it, without having scorned it, after learning those words and syllables well, they should be laid alongside the Discourses, they should be compared with the Discipline.

If, when these are laid alongside the Discourses, compared with the Discipline, they do not fit in with the Discourses, they do not compare well with the Discipline, you may here come to this conclusion: ‘Certainly this is not the Gracious One’s word, it is not well learned by that Community,’ and, monks, you should abandon it. If when these are laid alongside the Discourses, compared with the Discipline, they do fit in with the Discourses, they do compare well with the Discipline, you may here come to this conclusion: ‘Certainly this is the Gracious One’s word, it is well-learned by that Community.’ This, monks, is the second Great Referral you should bear in mind.

3) Here, monks, a monk might speak like this: ‘In a certain dwelling place live many elders, very learned, who have learned the traditions, who are bearers of the Teaching, bearers of the Discipline, bearers of the Tabulation, I have heard this directly from those elders, directly I learned it: “This is the Teaching, this is the Discipline, this is the Teacher’s Dispensation.”’ Those monks’ speech, monks, is not to be rejoiced over, not to be scorned at. Without having rejoiced over it, without having scorned it, after learning those words and syllables well, they should be laid alongside the Discourses, they should be compared with the Discipline.

If, when these are laid alongside the Discourses, compared with the Discipline, they do not fit in with the Discourses, they do not compare well with the Discipline, you may here come to this conclusion: ‘Certainly this is not the Gracious One’s word, it is not well learned by those elders,’ and, monks, you should abandon it. If when these are laid alongside the Discourses, compared with the Discipline they do fit in with the Discourses, they do compare well with the Discipline, you may here come to this conclusion: ‘Certainly this is the Gracious One’s word, it is well-learned by those elders.’ This, monks, is the third Great Referral you should bear in mind.

4) Here, monks, a monk might speak like this: ‘In a certain dwelling place lives one elder, very learned, who has learned the traditions, a bearer of the Teaching, a bearer of the Discipline, a bearer of the Tabulation, I have heard this directly from that elder, directly I learned it: “This is the Teaching, this is the Discipline, this is the Teacher’s Dispensation.”’ That monk’s speech, monks, is not to be rejoiced over, not to be scorned at. Without having rejoiced over it, without having scorned it, after learning those words and syllables well, they should be laid alongside the Discourses, they should be compared with the Discipline.

If, when these are laid alongside the Discourses, compared with the Discipline they do not fit in with the Discourses, they do not compare well with the Discipline, you may here come to this conclusion: ‘Certainly this is not the Gracious One’s word, it is not well learned by that elder,’ and, monks, you should abandon it. If when these are laid alongside the Discourses, compared with the Discipline, they do fit in with the Discourses, they do compare well with the Discipline, you may here come to this conclusion: ‘Certainly this is the Gracious One’s word, it is well-learned by that elder.’ This, monks, is the fourth Great Referral you should bear in mind. These, monks, are the Four Great Referrals you should bear in mind.”

-- DN 16

We might think that we've been following the Buddha's teaching and path, but compare our practice with the above teaching -- are we really followers of the Buddha, or someone(s) else?

Metta to all!

Starter
starter
 
Posts: 848
Joined: Mon Jul 12, 2010 9:56 pm

PreviousNext

Return to General Theravāda discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Ben, Unrul3r and 8 guests