Tantric Theravada?

A discussion on all aspects of Theravāda Buddhism

Re: Tantric Theravada?

Postby mirco » Tue Dec 20, 2011 10:47 pm

gavesako wrote:BANA BHANTE of Bangladesh is regarded as an Arahant by Buddhists of Bangladesh ...

Thank you, Venerable Sir.

There are some videos of him on uTube.

Maybe someone knows of transcriptions+translations of any of his teachings?


Regards, :-)
I get what I give
mirco
 
Posts: 362
Joined: Mon Jun 07, 2010 2:12 pm

Re: Tantric Theravada?

Postby rowboat » Tue Dec 20, 2011 11:48 pm

mirco wrote:
gavesako wrote:BANA BHANTE of Bangladesh is regarded as an Arahant by Buddhists of Bangladesh ...

Thank you, Venerable Sir.

There are some videos of him on uTube.

Maybe someone knows of transcriptions+translations of any of his teachings?


Regards, :-)


First, thank you Bhante Gavesako for your contributions on this thread.

mirco, here is some contact information for Bana Bhante. These people should be able to help you if there are any translations of Venerable Bana Bhante:

email: rajbanavihara@gmail.com
Office: Room No. 2/1, Gate Building, Rajbana Vihara, Rangamati- 4500, Bangladesh.
Location: Rajbana Vihara Complex, 4500 Rangamati, Bangladesh
Rain soddens what is covered up,
It does not sodden what is open.
Therefore uncover what is covered
That the rain will not sodden it.
Ud 5.5
User avatar
rowboat
 
Posts: 415
Joined: Sun Aug 22, 2010 5:31 am
Location: Brentwood Bay, British Columbia

Re: Tantric Theravada?

Postby DarwidHalim » Wed Dec 21, 2011 1:51 am

The title of this thread attract my attention.

May I know bhante, what make you put the title as 'Tantric Theravada'

When I look into te article, I am looking for a component, which can be considered as tantra part.

I cannot find it.

I found this'
...A new sphere brighter and clearer than the last will appear at the centre which is called the sphere of self-discipline. In the same way, the sphere of concentration, the sphere of wisdom, the sphere of liberation, the sphere of knowledge and vision of liberation can be attained in sequence. If one stops one's mind at the point at the centre of the sphere, it will enlarge until it is so large that its edges disappear over the horizon allowing one to see the subtle human body inside - an inner body that looks the same as the physical body, but more radiant. On attaining the subtle human body, the realization will arise in the mind that...

This is not tantra, this is simply a meditation technique with light.

Tantra meditation plays with our inner energy. The breathing is modified in such as way and this body is viewed in such a way to open our chakra. We make use of this chakra benefit to directly experience emptiness.

I don't see any energy component inside your article and to me that is not tantra at all.

What make you put the title as Tantric Theravada?
I am not here nor there.
I am not right nor wrong.
I do not exist neither non-exist.
I am not I nor non-I.
I am not in samsara nor nirvana.
To All Buddhas, I bow down for the teaching of emptiness. Thank You!
User avatar
DarwidHalim
 
Posts: 537
Joined: Thu Sep 08, 2011 11:49 am
Location: Neither Samsara nor Nirvana

Re: Tantric Theravada?

Postby gavesako » Wed Dec 21, 2011 8:16 am

As I mentioned in the first post, the term "tantra" is hard to define and various scholars disagree about exactly which elements it encompasses. It certainly has to do with techniques of visualisation, energy flows in the body, and mantra recitation.

The term yogāvacara, and less commonly yogin/yogī, stands for 'meditator' in Visuddhimagga and Pali commentaries.

The term yogāvacarabhikkhu, 'meditator-bhikkhu' is only found two times in the Pali commentaries and a dozen or so times in the sub-commentaries, whereas yogāvacara is relatively common and is already found in the Paṭisambhidāmagga and Peṭakopadesa.

The Patisambhidamagga commentary defines yogāvacaro, but it is hard to translate literally because of double senses.
Yogāvacaroti samathayoge, vipassanāyoge vā avacaratīti yogāvacaro. Avacaratīti pavisitvā caratī ti. : ''One who is engaged in meditation-exercise: he is engaged in the meditation-exercise of insight and the meditation-exercise of serenity, [therefore he is called] one who is occupied with meditation-exercise. Engaged in: having entered upon, he exercises.''

In modern times the term yogāvacara has come to be associated with what is called 'Khmer esoteric/tantric Buddhism,' etc, denoting the mixture of Buddhist meditation and chanting with tantra, yantras and mantras, white magic, invocations, etc. as commonly practiced in Thailand, Cambodia and Laos.

Perhaps the rise of the Srivijaya or one of the Khmer dynasties in which both Theravada, Vajrayana and the Buddhism of various Mahayana schools were all practiced, promoted and even syncretized in various ways was the origin. The same syncretization also happened in India (Tantra, Yoga) and Tibet (with the Bon tradition) and it was carried on in South East Asia. There was the official textual & doctrinal Buddhism, but on the other hand there were, and are, all sorts of other unofficial, non-doctrinal 'esoteric' practices going on besides or underneath, which were sometimes textualised and sometimes not.

In the mid 18th century this mixture of Buddhist meditation, ritual and esoteric practices was introduced into the Kandyan Kingdom by Thai monks from the Ayutthaya Kingdom. It was taught to monks of the Asgiriya Nikāya, who saw themselves as the inheritors of the forest dwelling, vanavasin, tradition, and founded several meditation hermitages around Kandy to practice meditation as taught by the Thais. The practices were written down in a manual called Cattālisa Kammaṭṭhāna or Vidarsana Potha, Amatakaravaṇṇana, Yogijanakanta-vimuttimagga, etc, of which several versions exist (Or different manuals were composed. This is not clear, as not much research has been done on the manuals as they are mostly in a mixture of Pali and Sinhala.). One of the versions was translated as 'The Manual of the Mystic: The Yogavachara's Manual' and was published by the PTS. See http://ebook.lib.hku.hk/CADAL/B31448586/index.html
The yogāvacara practice by the Asgiriya monks did not last long and nothing remains of this meditation tradition except the manuscripts with the manuals and the hermitages, which are now village temples.

This 'esoteric' tradition was also carried to England by the Thai man who founded the Samatha Group in Cambridge. Apparently they do an unusual meditation practice in which the 32 physical characteristics of the Buddha are visualized in their own bodies together with Pali paritta chanting. See http://www.samatha.org/texts/samatha-bu ... tion-texts

The introduction of practices such as the visualizations of the marks (laksana + anuvyanjana) of the Buddha(s) - practices that we can relate to the Buddhanussati/Buddhanusmrti traditions that begun probably not long after the parinibbana of the Buddha as a means of establishing an emotional/religious/empowering connection with the deceased master - are most likely among the first signs of the incipient "Mahayana" in Indian Buddhism. They started among followers of "traditional Buddhism" and had nothing particularly "esoteric" about them, originally. They had a devotional aspect and a meditative side to them. Early Mahayana sutras such as the Pratyutpannabuddhasamukhavastitasamadhi-sutra (studied by Paul Harrison) and even the Astasahasrikaprajnaparamita discuss the significance of the laksanas as Dharmamukhas. There provided 'Dharmic' rather than "energetic" empowerment, so to speak. These practices were most likely mass practices, I'd say, i.e., the opposite of esoteric or secret, and far more accessible than other types of meditation or doctrinal study.
After the passing of the Buddha, only two of the Three Jewels were really present to followers: Dhamma and Sangha, and visualisation of the Buddha was probably simply a way of making the first, and perhaps, chief jewel present to the devotee.

:buddha1:
Bhikkhu Gavesako
Kiṃkusalagavesī anuttaraṃ santivarapadaṃ pariyesamāno... (MN 26)

ajahnchah.org - Teachings of Ajahn Chah in many languages
Dhammatube - Videos on Buddhist practice
Ancient Buddhist Texts - Translations and history of Pali texts
User avatar
gavesako
 
Posts: 1346
Joined: Sun Jan 04, 2009 5:16 pm
Location: England

Re: Tantric Theravada?

Postby gavesako » Wed Dec 21, 2011 8:41 am

Here is a Facebook page for Bana Bhante in Bangladesh with many photos (note that "b" and "v" are often interchangeable in Pali):

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Bono-Vante/191946346982

Location
Rajbana Vihara, Rangamati, Bangladesh
Birthday
8 January 1920
Biography
His Holiness Ven. Sadhanananda Mahathero(Bana Bhante)

About Ven. Bana Bhante:

Ven. Bana Bhante(the forest monk) is the well-known, famously worshipped, clairvoyant, omnipotent, omniscient Bhikkshu in Bangladesh who has attained the highest magga 'Arahanta'. For over forty years, transcending religious barriers, creed, and other societal divisions, he has been providing directions to people from all walks of life much like Lord Gautama Buddha, about their moral and spiritual developments. As such, Ven. Banabhante has never been beholden to any particualr sects or segments of population nor to any particular individuals for their devotion to him as arduous devotees. Belonging to no one , he truly belongs to ALL of those who come to embrace his edifying ideals to enrich their lives by nurturing and cultivating 'kusala kamma'.

As an Arahanta, His Holiness Ven. Banabhante maintains strict discipline in upholding dictates of Lord Buddha for the 'Sangha' entailed in 'Binoypitok' and he steadfastly avoids any claims of ownership on anything --money, expensive gifts, material property, and 'special devotees' . Individuals by their own merits and contents of inner qualities can endear themselves to Ven. Banabhantee and as such one's nearness to the venerable Bhikkshu cannot be deemed as his personal preferences. Indeed, as a clairvoyant Arahanta, he can instantly view latent merits or 'lack of' among his devotees. For he has risen to the summit heights of immesuarable achievements surpassing normative, ontological boundaries. His fundamental philosophy and teachings emanate from Buddha's teachings as he reminds everyone in quotidian living the importance and needs for observance of Lord Buddha's principles of 'sila'(good conduct), 'samadhi'(right meditation), and 'prajna'(attainment of wisdom).

As life cannot be divorced from diurnal existence, it becomes all the more urgent that we pay attention to our conducts and Ven. Bana Bhante passionately propounds that flourishing of inner virtues lie inextricably intertwined with our mental inclinations. Our actions with putrid predilections will inevitably bring about unwholesome outcomes embodying 'dukkha' meaning sufferings. His teachings are pointed remarks on endless sufferings mired in our cycles of rebirths and stark reminders that our actions yield unavoidable consequences based on its own merits.There is no magic wand by which one's mischievous deeds could simply be, despite infinite wishes, washed away or wiped off by some miraculous quackery. Thus, grounded in scientific reality of inter-connectedness between causes and effects, and in reasonable discernment Ven. Bana Bhante envisions a community of present and future progenies who would adhesively adhere to edifying conducts devoid of 'Ahimsa', hidden jealousy, envy, acrimonious feelings and other conducts borne out of filthy perversities--in thoughts, words, and in all kinds of daily activities. As we yearn to live in peace and harmony, our actions must coincide with our inner state of mind. Negative, unwholesome thoughts with mental defilements will inevitably breed unwanted, undesirable outcome. One needs to investigate into the nature of reality by delving deep into the reality of mind and matter within self, not in the form penance, but in sincere attempts to extricate mind from inward defilements. Careful observations of reality by interrogating the nature of relaity leads to observation of truth. It is to know the self through process of self-examination.That investigation requires vigilence, self-discipline and incisive self-analyses into the contents of our thoughts. This art of living is deeply embedded in Vipassana Meditation

Born in Rangamati, on the auspicious day of 8th January, 1920, Rathindranath bore signs of an occult and astounding greatness. His gaze since childhood was set on a far distant future as though he remained deeply absorbed in compassionate contemplation at humanity's intense sufferings and finding ways to alleviate their pains and incalculable misery. His observations on the world around us gave him the determinations to set out in search of 'Saimyak gyan' or right views. Merely a novice in the Buddhist Sangha, the 'Rathindra Sraman' made a query to his then teacher Sri Dipankar Mahathero who were staying at Chittagong Buddhist temple. His teacher was startled by his disciples' rather audacious inquiry-'how to attain right wisdom' or 'Prajna'. The young 'samana' was discontent at heart as he failed to quench his bubbled up thirst to grasp the infinite, immesuarable, and ineffable. An enormous inward transformation brought about a stupendous, supramental consciousness as 'Rathindranath Sraman' embarked on his unkown journey at nearby Longhadhu Forest adjacent to his childhood residence at Dhanpata forsaking mortal dangers, agonies of sensory deprivations of foods and shelter. He was fearless like Siddharta Sri Goutama whose 'mahaviniskraman' certainly gave him the exemplary impetus to be worth emulating. And, Rathindranath after 12 years of austere practice of Bippassana emerged as the 'Forest Monk', the venerable 'Bana Bhante'. The uniqueness of 'Bana Bhante's' emergence did not simply come from introspective dissection or from intellectual analyses of contents of his vast consciousness. It had gone through a gigantic inward transformation saturated in his unnerving determination like Tennyson's Ulysses--'to strive, to seek, and to find, but never to yield'.

It is difficult to fathom the depth , scope , intensity of this 'great sage' , but one can speculate Sri Aurobindo's eternal words reverberating in the contours of Bana Bhante's enormous psyche--'man is Nature's great item of transition in which she grows Conscious of her aim. In him she looks from the animal with open eyes towards the divine ideal'. It was , indeed, this imperceptible , yet intensely palpable at heart which propelled to remind within him rather incessently the Nietschzean ideal--'If the night and the day are such that you greet them with joy, if life emits a fragrance like flowers and sweet scented herbs, is more elastic, more starry, and more immortal; that is your success''. To Ven. Bana Bhante, life is like Nietschze' s vision which means 'for us constantly to transform into light and flame all that we are and we meet with'. He drew the lesson from Buddha-'Atma Dipa Biharena Atma Sarana Aynya Sarana' meaning 'Know thyself' and entuned his mind, heart and entire being into Shakespearean addage--'To thine own self be true , Then it must follow as night the day'. His significance, therefore, can be discerned not only to those who are initiated but to the values he remotely suggests by this extraordinary manifestation of the superhuman in the process of his 'becoming' into the 'Bana Bhante'. His titanic influence has spread an immense awareness and has compelled a vast sea of humanity in his surrounding region to retreat from habitual walks and to aspire to redefine their lives by 'practices of Bipassana'. Like T. S. Eliot, Ven. Banabhante portrays the stark futility of human existence in his unceasing advocacy for ' continence', 'metta' and 'peaceful co-existence' in a world where blood shook his heart at 'The awful daring of a moment's surrender, which an age of prudence can never retract, by this , and this only, we have existed which is not to be found in our obituaries, or in memories draped by the beneficient spider' (Wasteland, T.S. Eliot). In such a world with full of 'endless duhkkha' Eliot's condign depiction finds a striking resonance in Ven. Banabhante's tireless espousal at needs for inward transformations. As the mortal existence in his view--"Here one can neither stand nor lie nor sit, there is not even silence in the mountains, but dry sterile thunder without rain, there is not even solitude in the mountains"(Wasteland, T.S.Eliot). It must be pointed out that he is not a messanger of gloom and despondency in our present existence but his emphasis is on needs for upliftment so as to eschew fatal consequences of 'Akusala Kamma'--unwholesome actions . He often questions 'how life can be lost in living' so that we engage in our efforts at seeking significance of life in our mortal existence

Discourses of Ven. Bana Bhante:

This body is borne out of 'Abidya' meaning ignorance and 'Tanha'meaning desire. The conjunction of 'Abidya' and 'Tanha' , instantaneously, results in birth of 'Panchaskandha'. So, the utmost efforts must be there to manintain an awareness about the nature of 'Abidya'. It means to be aware of all activities pervading our daily existence. Ven. Bana Bhante lays tremendous emphasis on the 'Satipatthana Vipassana' and is scornful of weak resolves of small motivations. He reminds that a ceaseless stream of efforts and awareness are essential requirements for practice of Vipassana Meditation . It is to cultivate choiceless awareness in the continuous movements of 'seeing', 'hearing', 'thinking' , imagining' etc. A beginner should endeavour to contemplate on 'arising' and 'vanishing' which eventually will give rise to 'insight of illness'.

This human existence in an individual may not take rebirth in human form once again, Ven. Banabhante sternly warns quite often as the next round of re-birth could take place in the unhappy life of lower existence. Everyone ought, therefore, strive to reach the first stage of 'Sottapatti magga' as a minimum achievement in this life. Ven. Bana Bhante's teachings and discourses focus essentially on Lord Buddha's 'Pratitya Samutpada Niti'--the laws of causations. He notes that efforts in mental discipline all too often is accompanied with unwanted tedious labor without delight , but the realization of nature of 'dukkha' and 'impermnance' will bring forth compassionate 'panna' to heal those wounds long-suppressed in the heart.

It is a frivolous exercise of preposterously empty-headed mind to be indulging into confabulation of 'Nature of Nibbana' with adornments of verbal ornamentation, wheareas a mind remains quagmired, inescapbly, in petty calculations of earning a little name and fame of being a 'writer' or 'thinker' in so doing and harboring surruptitiously hidden jealousy, envy and other mental defilements. It is pragmatic rather not to dwell on this imagined state of "Nibbana' but to work with steely determination in attaining 'magga' by delving deep into the practices of mindfulness with an inexorable pace. It is imperative that a mind extricate fully from 'kama'-'lustful thoughts' long before one ponders on the 'state of Nibbana'. From a sloka in Dhammapada, one can discern the fatal consequences of lustful thoughts forewarned by Lord Buddha--'Kamatu jayate shoka, Kamatu jayate bhayang, Kamatu bippimuttassu natthi shoka kutu bhayang'. The ideation and identification of sense of ''me', or 'I' is borne out of misperceived assumptions inbred within us in the form of 'ignorance'. This ignorance is of 'Lokuttara Gyan', which cannot be erased by accumulation of institutional knowledge or by resorting to pedagogy of an instructional curriculum by any self-acclaimed, clever saints espousing various adjectives of religiousity, at times, far-fatched, about the unseen, unfelt qualities of 'Nibbana'. Leaving cacophonies of such self-professed attributes of 'emptiness' from caterwauls of Sadhus aside, Ven. Banabhante once described ' Nibbana' as cessation of all 'dukkhas'. His attainment of "Nibbana' is epitomized in his very self-absorbed, succinct depiction of a sublime state which needed no cliched, tautological , and tortured wordings like crochet cross-gained of a mundane wordsmith. There lurks a hidden danger in such labybrinthine web of ornamentations as it represents an insidious image of vain glory in the guise of substantive discourse. It is also important to decipher the actual meanings of 'Etipiso Bhagava, Arahang, Samma Sambuddho, Bijja-charana samppnna, Sugata, Lokabido, Anuttara, Puriso Dhamma Sarathi, Satta, Deba, Manussacha, Buddho bhagabati'. The critical emphasis, Ven BanaBhante mentions is on the word 'Etipiso' meaning 'This is the'. It refres to 'absolute', uneqivocal, irreconcilable, recondite and 'Adaitavm'. The uniqueness of the Lord Buddha's teachings sets him apart and Ven. Bana Bhante's emanenace as embodiment of Buddha's teachings mark a pronounced departure from teachings of other 'luminaries' amongst our contemporary epoch-makers or trend-setters. After all, all that glitters is not gold and one can think of only Krishnamurti who has ascended to that identical stage of spritual pre-eminence. It will, therefore, be misleading to bring into the discourses of Ven. Banabhante a quixotic and arbitrary relevance of 'others who are temperamentally and philosophically, unrelated to his 'Panna' or 'Wisdom', just beacuse one has read about them 'a little' and can bridge a connection by some melange of words according to one's inclinations to profess to be a reservoir, albeit mini, of infinite knowledge. It must be emphasized here that Lord Buddha counseled humanity to 'expand compassion to all living beings just as a mother distributes her boundless love for her only offspring'. ........'Mata Yata Niyang Puttang, Ayusa Eka Putta Manurakhye, Ebampi Sabba Bhutesu, Manasang Bhavaye aparimang'. As the true disciple of Buddha , Ven. BanaBhante stressed solely on 'peaceful co-existence, on metta, even when he was faced with 'sagacious or practical choices' on numerous occassions as was witnessed by this author. His instructions were on farewell to arms adhering to Buddha's principles of 'peaceful co-existence'. The significance of Ven. Banabhante's emanace, seems to me, lies in averting a cataclysmic maelstorm surrounding his native region where as an apostle of peace he made us aware of 'higher values' in our spiritual journey and in so doing, he resonated teachings of Lord Gautam Buddha. It is in the principles of 'Ahimsa' 'metta' and peaceful co-existence, we can attain some measure of sanity in our daily living.


Ven. Bana Bhante resides at Raj Bana Bihar, Rangamati, Chittagong, Bangladesh. Contents collated and and authored by: Ranjan Kumar Barua, U.S.A, 2008.authored by: Ranjan Kumar Barua, U.S.A, 2008.eschewing all kinds of hostile activities and practising equinimity, ceaselessly, even in the face of extreme provocation and to adjust a living upholding principles of 'peaceful co-existence'. The significance of Ven. Banabhante's emanace, seems to me, lies in averting a cataclysmic maelstorm surrounding his native region where as an apostle of peace he made us aware of 'higher values' in our spiritual journey and in so doing, he resonated teachings of Lord Gautam Buddha. It is in the principles of 'Ahimsa' 'metta' and peaceful co-existence, we can attain some measure of sanity in our daily living.
Bhikkhu Gavesako
Kiṃkusalagavesī anuttaraṃ santivarapadaṃ pariyesamāno... (MN 26)

ajahnchah.org - Teachings of Ajahn Chah in many languages
Dhammatube - Videos on Buddhist practice
Ancient Buddhist Texts - Translations and history of Pali texts
User avatar
gavesako
 
Posts: 1346
Joined: Sun Jan 04, 2009 5:16 pm
Location: England

Re: Tantric Theravada?

Postby gavesako » Mon Dec 26, 2011 9:38 am

Like Kitesvara Lokanattha – Arahat still lives in this world.
(18 Lohans (Arahats) including Rahula Thera)


Of the four stages of Ariya – sotapanna, sekadagami, anagami and Arahat - , Arahat is the ultimate stage in Theravada Sect; where else Bodhisatta (Bodhisattvas) is the ultimate stage in Mahayana sect. Both Theravada and Mahayana revere Sakkyamuni (Gotama Buddha) as supreme Buddha. There is only one teaching Buddha appears in an era.There is only one Buddha in any given era, and the best that a Theravadin could hope for Arahatship. Both man and woman could develop their spiritual progress to attain arahatship. In early Buddhism, in the life time of our Lord Buddha, he had established Sangha order to include both man and women; the male Arahat is called Thera and the woman Arahat is called Theri. Arahat possesses six supernatural powers and one of them is the ability to fly like bird in the sky. Therefore, at the start of Buddhism, both male and female arahats were seen in the sky journeying to places of their destination. There is a question in Theravada – asking:

“Whether an Arahat reappear in this world after he/she took parinibbana?

Many of Theravadins will say, after parinibbana an Arahat no longer live in this world. Since there is no longer rebirth for them, why then in Myanmar people still worship Shin Thiwali (Sivali Thera) and Shin Upagote (Moggaliputta Tissa Maha Thera) for protection and accumulation of wealth?

Shin Upagote (Upagutta) – for protection against evil doers
Shin Thiwali (Sivali) – for wealth and fortune.

...

http://maungpaw.blogspot.com/2006/11/li ... still.html
Bhikkhu Gavesako
Kiṃkusalagavesī anuttaraṃ santivarapadaṃ pariyesamāno... (MN 26)

ajahnchah.org - Teachings of Ajahn Chah in many languages
Dhammatube - Videos on Buddhist practice
Ancient Buddhist Texts - Translations and history of Pali texts
User avatar
gavesako
 
Posts: 1346
Joined: Sun Jan 04, 2009 5:16 pm
Location: England

Re: Tantric Theravada?

Postby gavesako » Mon Dec 26, 2011 1:45 pm

Worship of Arahat

Worshipping an arahat is a tradition known only in Mahayana sect; however, in Theravada country like Myanmar, Buddhists pay reverence to Sivali Thera (Shin Thiwali) believing that he will bring abundance of wealth and riches to ease the pain and suffering of living in this mundane world. Maha Sivali (Shin Thi Wa Li Thera) image is being highly revered by many Buddhist householders in Myanmar.
Sivali Thera, at the time of Buddha, was declared by Buddha to be the foremost in receiving the most requisites among the Buddha disciples. His image is considered as a talisman or charm that brings wealth and worldly riches.
...
http://maungpaw.blogspot.com/2006/05/wo ... rahat.html


Signs of Holiness in Buddhist Dhamma Practice

Several decades in the past many in Myanmar practice Samatha Bhavana; today, the trend has changed to Vipassana as people follow the trendy Vipassana meditation centers. Monks and laities in those days wear meditation mala beads (seikbade) in their hands as opposed to monks of today who feel shy to wear mala beads openly in public.

There are two practices known by the Pali word: Bhavana: one can practice either Samatha or Vipassana Bhavana. Both practices are nothing more than cultivating and developing one’s mind by repeated scrutinizing, meditating or contemplating to penetrate the truth. It is a mental task of continuous recitation or repeated scrutinizing. In the beginning of each of these two practices, meditators with close affinity to Devas and Brahmas will sense through physically the feeling of electricity hovering around oneself, which is known as aura or presence of spirit or spirits. It is a sign of holiness of a person.
...
http://maungpaw.blogspot.com/2006/06/si ... hamma.html


Does Divine eye indicates spiritual attainment?


In practicing the Buddha’s instruction, there were in the past, some who had attained Sotapanna (stream winner), Sekadagami (once returner) or anagami (non-returner. At this spiritual level of attainment, they were able to communicate with devas. In Dhammapada verses 73/74, we learnt that Citta had gained the level of Anagami (non-returner). So when he was in his death bed, the garden devas, forest devas, tree devas, and devas inhabiting herbs, grasses, and forest giants assembled and together came to suggest to him to wish for a wheel-turning monarch in his next life. Based on the story of Citta (Gilana sutta), we perhaps can say that those who had attained sotapanna, sekadagami or anagami should already have attained the supernatural power of:

The divine ability to communicate with devas.
The divine eye to see devas

An individual having a divine eye and divine ability to talk to devas are indications that he/she has attained a certain level of spiritual attainment. I will present the Gilana sutta, the story of Citta to support this assumption. This story also tells us that there are all kinds of devas living in the environment around us. It is up to individual who respect devas to pay respect to devas for mundane benefit in this very life. In some way Citta found devas very helpful for affirmation of his virtuous life style.
...
http://maungpaw.blogspot.com/2006/07/do ... itual.html
Bhikkhu Gavesako
Kiṃkusalagavesī anuttaraṃ santivarapadaṃ pariyesamāno... (MN 26)

ajahnchah.org - Teachings of Ajahn Chah in many languages
Dhammatube - Videos on Buddhist practice
Ancient Buddhist Texts - Translations and history of Pali texts
User avatar
gavesako
 
Posts: 1346
Joined: Sun Jan 04, 2009 5:16 pm
Location: England

Re: Tantric Theravada?

Postby Clarence » Mon Dec 26, 2011 2:15 pm

Venerable,

Thanks for your posts. They are very informative and interesting. I had no idea about a lot of these practices.

Are you practicing yourself now in the tradition of Tantric Theravada? Very curious whether or not there are still teachers teaching this kind of stuff.

Best, C
Clarence
 
Posts: 54
Joined: Sun Jul 11, 2010 5:49 pm

Re: Tantric Theravada?

Postby Mr. G » Mon Dec 26, 2011 3:18 pm

Fascinating Bhante! Thank you!
Even if my body should be burnt to death
In the fires of hell,
I would endure it for myriad lifetimes
As your companion in practice
- Gandavyuha Sutra
User avatar
Mr. G
 
Posts: 50
Joined: Wed Jan 20, 2010 5:27 am

Re: Tantric Theravada?

Postby plwk » Mon Dec 26, 2011 3:41 pm

As I mentioned in the first post, the term "tantra" is hard to define and various scholars disagree about exactly which elements it encompasses. It certainly has to do with techniques of visualisation, energy flows in the body, and mantra recitation.

Agreed Bhante. Amongst the so many 'exotic' ones, I find HHDL's most fascinating...
Image pg.111-12
Tantra is limited to persons whose compassion is so great that they cannot bear to spend unnecessary time in attaining Buddhahood, as they want to be a supreme source of help and happiness for others quickly
Bhikkhus, if you develop and make much this one thing,
it invariably leads to weariness, cessation, appeasement, realization and extinction.
What is it? It is recollecting the Enlightened One.
If this single thing is recollected and made much,
it invariably leads to weariness, cessation, appeasement, realization and extinction.

Anguttara-Nikaya: Ekanipata: Ekadhammapali: Pañhamavagga
VSM VMM WBB TBHT WTBT My Page
plwk
 
Posts: 1126
Joined: Mon Mar 01, 2010 5:14 am

Re: Tantric Theravada?

Postby gavesako » Mon Dec 26, 2011 3:50 pm

Clarence wrote:Venerable,

Thanks for your posts. They are very informative and interesting. I had no idea about a lot of these practices.

Are you practicing yourself now in the tradition of Tantric Theravada? Very curious whether or not there are still teachers teaching this kind of stuff.

Best, C


No, I am just a detached observer. But the longer I stay in the Theravada tradition and learn about the cultures in Asia and the beliefs and practices of Theravada Buddhists, I have to expand my understanding of the whole tradition and include all these aspects as well. They are still very much part of the living tradition, even though not officially acknowledged in the typical books which only focus on the "ideal form" of Theravada Buddhism according to the Pali scriptures.
Bhikkhu Gavesako
Kiṃkusalagavesī anuttaraṃ santivarapadaṃ pariyesamāno... (MN 26)

ajahnchah.org - Teachings of Ajahn Chah in many languages
Dhammatube - Videos on Buddhist practice
Ancient Buddhist Texts - Translations and history of Pali texts
User avatar
gavesako
 
Posts: 1346
Joined: Sun Jan 04, 2009 5:16 pm
Location: England

Re: Tantric Theravada?

Postby Clarence » Mon Dec 26, 2011 4:58 pm

gavesako wrote:
Clarence wrote:Venerable,

Thanks for your posts. They are very informative and interesting. I had no idea about a lot of these practices.

Are you practicing yourself now in the tradition of Tantric Theravada? Very curious whether or not there are still teachers teaching this kind of stuff.

Best, C


No, I am just a detached observer. But the longer I stay in the Theravada tradition and learn about the cultures in Asia and the beliefs and practices of Theravada Buddhists, I have to expand my understanding of the whole tradition and include all these aspects as well. They are still very much part of the living tradition, even though not officially acknowledged in the typical books which only focus on the "ideal form" of Theravada Buddhism according to the Pali scriptures.

1
Thanks. I hope people won't come down too hard on you. We tend to like our ideal forms. :-)
Clarence
 
Posts: 54
Joined: Sun Jul 11, 2010 5:49 pm

Re: Tantric Theravada?

Postby kirtu » Mon Dec 26, 2011 9:00 pm

gavesako wrote:Anything to do with Buddha pouring or casting ceremonies involves a lot of "tantric" magic. Below you can see Reusi Kesa-kaew, a well-known rishi with long hair who gets invited to some forest monasteries as well and has a bodhisattva reputation, presiding over such a ceremony together with a monk:

http://board.palungjit.com/f2/almine-%E ... 634-8.html


Bhante -

Thank-you for your fascinating thread.

What is the role of a rishi in the Theravadin tradition? I'm quite surprised to hear the term used amongst Theravadins. Would a rishi only be a layperson or would it be possible for a monk as well (I'm thinking of stories of monks meditating their whole lives on lovingkindness for the world for example)?

Thanks!

Kirt
kirtu
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Mar 27, 2011 4:14 pm

Re: Tantric Theravada?

Postby Gena1480 » Tue Dec 27, 2011 6:07 am

i just read a sutta that Buddha does not tell his disciples to show the powers
yet he gives instruction in the sutta, the power of instruction is allowed
one of the physic powers
showing such power
and giving instruction on how to attain it
giving instruction is allowed
but if showed
the Buddha tells that people will
think that it because of not the power of the mind
but by the way of magic
Gena1480
 
Posts: 305
Joined: Mon Jul 18, 2011 1:36 am

Re: Tantric Theravada?

Postby gavesako » Wed Dec 28, 2011 8:49 pm

I know that in Thailand and Burma there are such rishis who specialize in magic and all kinds of rituals. Rishis of course occur in the Buddhist texts as well, so these rishis style themselves after them. In some cases they are more like white-clothes laymen living in solitude and meditating. Their meditation methods would be focused on visions and predictions of future events, and gaining powers of various sorts. But they are acknowledged and venerated by the general Buddhist population as well, and in some cases they might be seen as Buddhas-in-the-making (i.e. Bodhisattvas) who are now at the stage of "building up parami". In the Jataka tales, the Buddha-to-be was sometimes also such a rishi.
Last edited by gavesako on Thu Dec 29, 2011 8:15 am, edited 1 time in total.
Bhikkhu Gavesako
Kiṃkusalagavesī anuttaraṃ santivarapadaṃ pariyesamāno... (MN 26)

ajahnchah.org - Teachings of Ajahn Chah in many languages
Dhammatube - Videos on Buddhist practice
Ancient Buddhist Texts - Translations and history of Pali texts
User avatar
gavesako
 
Posts: 1346
Joined: Sun Jan 04, 2009 5:16 pm
Location: England

Re: Tantric Theravada?

Postby Gena1480 » Wed Dec 28, 2011 11:15 pm

why do you consider practicing Parami Tantric?
Do you consider practice of recollection of past Buddhas Tantric?
and regarding Buddhas
what ever
subject to origination
subject to cessation
this include Buddhas of the past.
Gena1480
 
Posts: 305
Joined: Mon Jul 18, 2011 1:36 am

Re: Tantric Theravada?

Postby gavesako » Thu Dec 29, 2011 9:41 pm

Practising paramis is part of the standard teachings in the Tipitaka, so nothing "tantric" about that.
Recollection of past Buddhas might be linked to visualization techniques which do have a tantric element.
Bhikkhu Gavesako
Kiṃkusalagavesī anuttaraṃ santivarapadaṃ pariyesamāno... (MN 26)

ajahnchah.org - Teachings of Ajahn Chah in many languages
Dhammatube - Videos on Buddhist practice
Ancient Buddhist Texts - Translations and history of Pali texts
User avatar
gavesako
 
Posts: 1346
Joined: Sun Jan 04, 2009 5:16 pm
Location: England

Re: Tantric Theravada?

Postby Gena1480 » Sun Jan 01, 2012 5:54 pm

practicing the ten parami
i personally would not use word perfection
to my understanding
the ten parami are unshakeable
like Jhanas and Panna of the Arahant
recollection of Buddha qualities
and then jumping to recollect the other Buddhas qualities
this kind of practice should be abandon
and i won't go further in detail, unless there is request
those who do not abandon this practice
do not abandon past kamma desire
Gena1480
 
Posts: 305
Joined: Mon Jul 18, 2011 1:36 am

Re: Tantric Theravada?

Postby retrofuturist » Mon Jan 02, 2012 1:00 am

Greetings Gena,

Do you mean tantric in the sense of trying to experience the embodiment of the Buddha, akin to how tantric practitioners might utilise a dakini?

Metta,
Retro. :)
If you have asked me of the origination of unease, then I shall explain it to you in accordance with my understanding:
Whatever various forms of unease there are in the world, They originate founded in encumbering accumulation. (Pārāyanavagga)


Exalted in mind, just open and clearly aware, the recluse trained in the ways of the sages:
One who is such, calmed and ever mindful, He has no sorrows! -- Udana IV, 7


Dharma Wheel (Mahayana / Vajrayana forum) -- Open flower ~ Open book (blog)
User avatar
retrofuturist
Site Admin
 
Posts: 14623
Joined: Tue Dec 30, 2008 9:52 pm
Location: Melbourne, Australia

Re: Tantric Theravada?

Postby gavesako » Mon Jan 09, 2012 8:12 am

Ghosts, amulets, ringtones, and the rest of Thai Buddhism
THE CACOPHONY OF RELIGION TODAY


Writer: Chris Baker

Somdet To is, according to Justin McDaniel "arguably the most famous monk in Thai history." His image, picture, chants, biographies, amulets, and pamphlets are everywhere. Yet you could read everything written on Thai Buddhism in English for scholars or tourists without noticing his existence, let alone his importance. In this superb book, McDaniel not only does justice to Somdet To but suggests a new way of thinking about "Thai Buddhism" and how it is studied.

Somdet To was born around 1788. There are many biographies, films, and webpages on his life, but they conflict wildly and there is little documentary proof. He is known through many stories. According to one version, he was the son of King Rama I, sired on a Lao peasant girl during a military campaign in the North. This story gives him origins that range from the top to the bottom of society, from centre to periphery. He became a great Pali scholar, abbot of prestigious Wat Rakhang, and a preceptor of kings.

But why is he so famous down to the present? Not for his teachings. Only a few sermons survive and they are unremarkable. Not for his writings _ a few pages with recipes for making amulets. Not for any philosophical innovation or reform movement. His legacy consists mainly of stories about his life which show him as compassionate, very down-to-earth, even ready to mock his great patron, the king.

As with the Buddha, stories of the life (and previous lives) are a form of teaching by example. But perhaps the best-known facts about Somdet To are that he meditated on corpses, exorcised ghosts, and specialised in making protective devices, especially amulets. He is remembered for his exceptional powers. Amulets have since become big business and Somdet To's are among the most valued and costly.

One story about Somdet To gives him a role in Siam's most famous ghost tale. After dying in childbirth, Mae Nak refused to abandon her beloved husband and brutally killed neighbours who told him he was living with a ghost. Somdet To was called in to quell Nak's spirit and end the carnage. Nak's local wat (temple), now in the Bangkok suburbs, is thronged everyday with people begging help from the spirit of this loving but vicious ghost, from Somdet To, and from a host of other shrines and fortune tellers.

Somdet To quelled the ghost with a chant, the Jinpanjara gatha. This rather martial verse is now hugely popular, available through pamphlet, radio broadcast downloadable ringtone, or impregnated in sacred water by a statue of Somdet To enclosing a recorder playing the chant on an endless loop.

McDaniel's point is that the practice of Buddhism in Thailand today is all about shrines to legendary ghosts, amulets related to famous old monks, magical chants used as ringtones, family outings to theme parks full of statues of figures gruesomely tortured in hell, and so on.

Scholars have presented an idealised Buddhism, cleansed and standardised by teachings from Sri Lanka, reform movements led by kings, and modern legislation. In reality, McDaniel argues, these efforts have all failed. There is not even a standard liturgy, a manual for religious performances. Thousands of monks and wats have produced their own versions. There has been no policing of the boundaries of what is worshipable. Local spirits, Hindu and Chinese gods, ghosts like Nak, past kings, and increasingly famous monks like Somdet To have slipped into the pantheon. An abbot asked McDaniel for a crucifix because he thought it would be a good addition to his collection of protective amulets.

McDaniel resists describing the result as syncretism on grounds that the practitioners themselves do not see it that way. The fashionable term, hybridity, does not appear once in this book. McDaniel also argues strongly against classifying practices into "pure Buddhism" and other, magical elements labelled as "tantric" or "esoteric." He suggests that "pure Buddhism" is something imagined by foreign scholars, particularly those with a Protestant background (McDaniel is Irish Catholic). In history, the "pure" and the rest cannot be disentangled. The Thammayut reform movement, which supposedly began as an effort to purify Buddhist practice, ended up lionizing forest monks famed for their supernatural powers. McDaniel delights in pointing out that several modern-day proponents of "pure" Buddhism also own protective amulets.

McDaniel suggests that individuals have "repertoires," meaning menus of religious things they will own or do. These repertoires can be very varied and very flexible over time. Fads come and go. Recently Ganesha has had a good run, but may now be fading. Neither state nor Sangha makes any significant effort to police what these repertoires may contain. The result is that "Thai Buddhism" is extraordinarily alive and inventive, with no sign of dying away like some well-regulated faiths. McDaniel scoffs at scholars who see the proliferation of cults and especially of commercialism as a reaction to capitalism, globalisation, and modern angst. He suggests instead that the variety and inventiveness is a product of unregulated popular ownership, and that things have probably always been much the same. He twits the reformers who wring their hands over crass commercialism, and would like Thai Buddhism to be all meditation and good works; their chances of quelling the cacophony of everyday practice are nil.

McDaniel also tries to define the messages and meanings of the real-world "Thai Buddhism" that includes Somdet To's martial chant, Mae Nak's shrine, hell theme parks, and all the rest. He suggest that besides the well-known Buddhist qualities of non-attachment, compassion, and enlightenment, everyday practice involves "a celebration of abundance, a promotion of heritage, a desire for security, and a rhetoric of graciousness." In short, people value protection from dangers, worldly success, fellow feeling, national identity, and more beauty in life.

Finally, McDaniel suggests that Thai Buddhism is changing. It no longer looks to India or Sri Lanka as its source, but sees itself as leader of the Theravada world. Meanwhile the position of the historical Buddha is shifting. In a typical wat today, crowds throng shrines to old monks, legendary ghosts, past kings, and local spirits while the hall housing the main image is often closed and locked. There is a trend of building massive statues of famous monks, including Somdet To. There are even wats where Somdet To's image has the central site and the Buddha is to one side.

This book informs, entertains, and provokes. I think this is the first volume on Buddhism which made me laugh, often. The author intends it to be controversial and hopefully it will provoke some fierce responses. Currently the publication is an expensive, academic-targeted hardback. Its appeal should be wider. Anyone interested in Thailand today, in Buddhism, in ghosts, or in why CentralWorld was burned down (it was the only building in the area with no protective shrine), should read this brilliant book.

http://www.bangkokpost.com/arts-and-cul ... i-buddhism

:buddha2:

Google book preview:

http://cup.columbia.edu/bookpreview/978-0-231-15376-8/



THE LOVELORN GHOST AND THE MAGICAL MONK
Practicing Buddhism in Modern Thailand


Written by Justin T. McDaniel

Columbia University Press, New York ISBN 978-0-231-15376-8

Stories centering on the lovelorn ghost (Mae Nak) and the magical monk (Somdet To) are central to Thai Buddhism. Historically important and emotionally resonant, these characters appeal to every class of follower. Metaphorically and rhetorically powerful, they invite constant reimagining across time.

Focusing on representations of the ghost and monk from the late eighteenth century to the present, Justin Thomas McDaniel builds a case for interpreting modern Thai Buddhist practice through the movements of these transformative figures. He follows embodiments of the ghost and monk in a variety of genres and media, including biography, film, television, drama, ritual, art, liturgy, and the Internet. Sourcing nuns, monks, laypeople, and royalty, he shows how relations with these figures have been instrumental in crafting histories and modernities. McDaniel is especially interested in local conceptions of being “Buddhist” and the formation and transmission of such identities across different venues and technologies.

Establishing an individual’s “religious repertoire” as a valid category of study, McDaniel explores the performance of Buddhist thought and ritual through practices of magic, prognostication, image production, sacred protection, and deity and ghost worship, and clarifies the meaning of multiple cultural configurations. Listening to popular Thai Buddhist ghost stories, visiting crowded shrines and temples, he finds concepts of attachment, love, wealth, beauty, entertainment, graciousness, security, and nationalism all spring from engagement with the ghost and the monk and are as vital to the making of Thai Buddhism as venerating the Buddha himself.
In this sweeping study full of fresh observations and original thinking, McDaniel continues his radical reinterpretation of Thai religious practice. Challenged to understand rituals, sacred objects, saints, deities, and spirits of bewildering diversity, he sees in a lovelorn ghost and magical monk a way to make sense of what seems senseless. He thereby dispels the familiar categories of Buddhism, Brahmanism, and animism. Does anyone understand Thai religion in all its complexity better than McDaniel? -- Craig J. Reynolds, Australian National University Justin Thomas McDaniel celebrates the complexity and situation-specific vitality of Buddhists and their 'repertoires' in his engaging work on contemporary, especially urban, Thailand. His book is a valuable resource for undergraduate and graduate teaching, and it is exemplary in its use of Thai, French, and English writings on Thailand and Buddhism. -- Anne Blackburn, Cornell University A brilliant and innovative book that not only carves out some important new directions in the study of Theravada Buddhism but also sets a new bar. If my students had time to read only one book on Southeast Asian Buddhism, this is the book I would choose. -- Anne Hansen, University of Wisconsin This magnificent, beguiling, and thought-provoking study describes and celebrates the heterogeneity and, as McDaniel puts it, the cacophony of Thai Buddhist experience as expressing the values of security, heritage, graciousness, and abundance. It should be read by every scholar of Buddhist studies and of religious studies more widely. An epoch-making achievement. -- Steve Collins, University of Chicago

http://cup.columbia.edu/book/978-0-231- ... gical-monk

:spy:


Thai Buddhism: Magic, Money and Murder

Justin T. McDaniel

A few years ago, a Buddhist novice monk, Han Raksachit, was arrested after he released a video tape of himself piercing, bleeding, roasting, chanting and collecting the drippings from a nearly full-term baby's corpse at Nong Rakam Monastery in Saraburi Province (central Thailand). These drippings, which he called ya sane (lust medicine), he sold to visitors. Although he was forced from the monastery and arrested, he did not serve jail time and was arrested again in 2005 for tricking several women into sexual acts and defrauding them of money in exchange for dubious claims that he could help them attract their true loves. He is serving time now on 23 counts of rape.

More recently, in late 2010, authorities discovered 348 corpses of aborted fetuses being held in plastic bags in a Buddhist monastery. They were bought from five different abortion clinics, supposedly to sell to magicians and amulet dealers. This was not a rural monastery on the border of Cambodia or Laos, but a monastery in Bangkok -- Wat Phai Ngoen. Later reports in several Thai news outlets spoke of the hundreds of people who were visiting the monastery after the discovery of the bodies to chant for the deceased foetuses. Some also came to inquire about the availability of the corpses for ritual use.

Thailand is well-known as a tourist paradise, a land rich in exotic flora and silk. It is also known as the most Buddhist country on earth with almost 94% of the country's 65 million people self-identifying as Buddhist. There are 34,000 Buddhist monasteries and over 300,000 monks residing in the country. However, Thai Buddhist practices, especially those involving the magical uses of corpses and protective amulets, as well as the pervasive Thai propitiation of ghosts, hell-beings and protective spectral children has rarely been investigated in any serious way. With the rise in popularity of Thai/Khom protective tattoos, most notably inspired by Angelina Jolie, Apichatpong Weerasethakul's top prize at the Cannes Film Festival for his Thai religion-themed movie and monks filmed near recent bloody clashes on the streets of Bangkok in last spring's democracy protests, the less savory side of Thai religion has been exposed to the outside world.

While ritual practices, sometimes involving aborted fetuses might seem strange or even reprehensible to a person not familiar with Thai Buddhism, they are actually not that shocking in Thailand. While the cases above are extreme and offended even Thai practitioners of Buddhism, less-severe, but related practices can be traced back centuries and are commonly known by many devout Buddhists. In fact, ritual practices to either enlist the power of spiritual denizens or protect against the curses of human rivals are employed by the country's leading politicians and power-brokers. The former Prime Minister Taksin Shinawatra was rumored to have performed secret magical rituals to ensure his shaky political fortunes in 2006 right before he was forcibly removed from office by a political movement led in part by Sondhi Limthongkul. In turn, Sondhi has performed protective rituals to guarantee his political fortunes after a series of bloody street battles between the his supporters and the government in Bangkok in the Fall of 2008. Other public figures like Thai film stars like Sorapong Chartree commissioned a huge 65 foot tall statue of a nineteenth century monk who as famous for making protective amulets and holy water and the famous monk Luang Phu Kasem inspired the construction of one of the largest Buddha statues in the world, as well as a hell theme-park (suan narok) to educate children about the the various levels of hell.

The Thai protective amulet industry is worth about 300 million USD per year. There are thousands of articles in popular amulet collector's magazines about the value and beauty of these small objects. There is a regular section in the popular Thai language newspaper, Thai Rath, called "Sanam Phra" which features new amulets on the market, stories of their production and occasionally a miracle story about how an amulet saved a person from drowning or helped her business. Some amulets have sold for as much as 1.75 million USD. However, there are many amulets that cost as little as 10 cents. These amulets, albeit rarely, can be made more powerful with the addition of "corpse fluid" (nam man phrai) from aborted fetuses or freshly deceased adults.

In my new book, "The Lovelorn Ghost and the Magical Monk: Practicing Buddhism in Modern Thailand" (Columbia University Press, 2011), I go beyond studies of Buddhist meditation, ethics, and philosophy in order to provide a historical background to many of today's Thai Buddhist practices. I provide a detailed, but hopefully accessible, analysis of the amulet trade, the use of protective tattoos, the rise of Thai horror films, the chanting of protective incantations, the popularity of ghost stories and the work of well-known Buddhist monks, saints and magicians. Even though Thai Buddhism presents itself (and has been so designated by foreign scholars and Western Buddhist enthusiasts) as normative, traditional and exceedingly well-behaved, I argue throughout that rather than hidden aspects of an otherwise orthodox and peaceful Thai Buddhism, these magical and protective rituals and stories are part of the Thai religious mainstream. If we are going to talk in useful ways about Thai culture, if we are going to learn from the various Thai ways of being Buddhist, then it is more accurate to look at what complex technologies people actually employ to solve problems -- the practical (and sometimes seemingly impractical) technologies of astrology, healing, protection, prognostication, precepts, and the like. In this way, I hope to offer a solid background to what a visitor to Thailand, whether she is a scholar of Buddhism or an engaged tourist, will actually see, smell, and hear in a monastery -- even if what we witness makes us want to run it the opposite direction.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/justin-mc ... 16115.html
Bhikkhu Gavesako
Kiṃkusalagavesī anuttaraṃ santivarapadaṃ pariyesamāno... (MN 26)

ajahnchah.org - Teachings of Ajahn Chah in many languages
Dhammatube - Videos on Buddhist practice
Ancient Buddhist Texts - Translations and history of Pali texts
User avatar
gavesako
 
Posts: 1346
Joined: Sun Jan 04, 2009 5:16 pm
Location: England

PreviousNext

Return to General Theravāda discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: TheNoBSBuddhist, waterchan and 10 guests