Philosophy of Epicurus and Buddhism

Casual discussion amongst spiritual friends.
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clw_uk
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Philosophy of Epicurus and Buddhism

Postby clw_uk » Sat May 16, 2009 3:10 pm

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vitellius
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Re: Philosophy of Epicurus and Buddhism

Postby vitellius » Sat May 16, 2009 4:43 pm


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clw_uk
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Re: Philosophy of Epicurus and Buddhism

Postby clw_uk » Sat May 16, 2009 4:55 pm

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Individual
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Re: Philosophy of Epicurus and Buddhism

Postby Individual » Sat May 16, 2009 8:11 pm

The best things in life aren't things.


vitellius
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Re: Philosophy of Epicurus and Buddhism

Postby vitellius » Mon Jul 13, 2009 10:33 am

For those interested in practice of Greek philosophers I recommend books by Pierre Hadot:

Philosophy as a way of life
http://books.google.com/books?id=RNDmvM ... frontcover

What is ancient philosophy?
http://books.google.com/books?id=op2sgv ... frontcover

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Cittasanto
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Re: Philosophy of Epicurus and Buddhism

Postby Cittasanto » Mon Jul 13, 2009 11:14 pm

Some monks I have had the opportunity to cross paths with have at times been very antiphilosophy without having the first idea what philosophy is or means.

the Greek and Indian Schools may have been looking at things from their own parculiar angle but they were supprisingly simmilar, Epicuurus has what could be called in Buddhist circles a monestary and Socrates lived in a manner akin to certain monks of Japan.

the two aren't at all disimilar, and it is peoples preconcieved notions which block the two really having a propper dialog in many respects.

If you live in the UK have a look on 4On Demand for philosophy programs by Alain DeBotton there are 4 episodes and these are very interesting.


He who knows only his own side of the case knows little of that. His reasons may be good, and no one may have been able to refute them.
But if he is equally unable to refute the reasons on the opposite side, if he does not so much as know what they are, he has no ground for preferring either opinion …
...
He must be able to hear them from persons who actually believe them … he must know them in their most plausible and persuasive form.

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clw_uk
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Re: Philosophy of Epicurus and Buddhism

Postby clw_uk » Mon Jul 13, 2009 11:18 pm

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Cittasanto
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Re: Philosophy of Epicurus and Buddhism

Postby Cittasanto » Mon Jul 13, 2009 11:29 pm



He who knows only his own side of the case knows little of that. His reasons may be good, and no one may have been able to refute them.
But if he is equally unable to refute the reasons on the opposite side, if he does not so much as know what they are, he has no ground for preferring either opinion …
...
He must be able to hear them from persons who actually believe them … he must know them in their most plausible and persuasive form.

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Cittasanto
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Re: Philosophy of Epicurus and Buddhism

Postby Cittasanto » Tue Jul 14, 2009 12:03 am



He who knows only his own side of the case knows little of that. His reasons may be good, and no one may have been able to refute them.
But if he is equally unable to refute the reasons on the opposite side, if he does not so much as know what they are, he has no ground for preferring either opinion …
...
He must be able to hear them from persons who actually believe them … he must know them in their most plausible and persuasive form.

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clw_uk
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Re: Philosophy of Epicurus and Buddhism

Postby clw_uk » Wed Sep 09, 2009 9:08 pm

Found some more Greek philosophy that seems to go well with Buddhas understanding and teachings, this time from Stoics though, wanted to share



Epictetus:

"Freedom is secured not by the fulfilling of one's desires, but by the removal of desire." (iv.1.175)

"Where is the good? In the will. Where is the evil? In the will. Where is neither of them? In those things that are independent of the will." (ii.16.1)
(intention is kamma?)


Marcus Aurelius:

"Get rid of the judgment, get rid of the 'I am hurt,' you are rid of the hurt itself." (viii.40)


Seneca the Younger:

"The point is, not how long you live, but how nobly you live." (Ep. 101.15)
Unbowed, Unbent, Unbroken

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polarbear101
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Re: Philosophy of Epicurus and Buddhism

Postby polarbear101 » Wed Feb 13, 2013 8:10 am

"I don't envision a single thing that, when developed & cultivated, leads to such great benefit as the mind. The mind, when developed & cultivated, leads to great benefit."

"I don't envision a single thing that, when undeveloped & uncultivated, brings about such suffering & stress as the mind. The mind, when undeveloped & uncultivated, brings about suffering & stress."

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polarbear101
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Re: Philosophy of Epicurus and Buddhism

Postby polarbear101 » Wed Feb 13, 2013 8:31 am

"I don't envision a single thing that, when developed & cultivated, leads to such great benefit as the mind. The mind, when developed & cultivated, leads to great benefit."

"I don't envision a single thing that, when undeveloped & uncultivated, brings about such suffering & stress as the mind. The mind, when undeveloped & uncultivated, brings about suffering & stress."


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